Emergency departments across Atlantic Health’s hospitals remain safe for every patient who enters, officials said.

Morristown Doctors Warn Of The Dangers Of Putting Off Care

MORRISTOWN, NJ – Emergency departments across Atlantic Health’s hospitals remain safe for every patient who enters, and officials say reconfigured processes and facilities are in place to optimize safety and improve the patient experience so prospective patients should not delay treatment.

New Jersey Coronavirus Updates: Don’t miss local and statewide announcements about new coronavirus precautions. Sign up for Patch alerts and daily newsletters.

“It’s critical the patients with urgent medical issues continue to come to the ED for care.
We have created processes and configured our facility to maximize the safety and
effective delivery of care for all of our patients,” said Dan Wiener, MD, Chair, Department
of Emergency Medicine at Morristown Medical Center.

All care is delivered with strict rules around social distancing, universal mask wearing,
rigorously enforced hand hygiene and advanced cleaning practices for the entire facility, officials said.

All patients will be triaged at the point of

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‘Not Priests, Nor Crosses, Nor Bells.’ The Tragic History of How Pandemics Have Disrupted Mourning

‘Not Priests, Nor Crosses, Nor Bells.’ The Tragic History of How Pandemics Have Disrupted Mourning

On a recent Monday in a New Jersey cemetery, social worker Jane Blumenstein held a laptop with the screen facing a gravesite. A funeral was being held over Zoom, for a woman who died of COVID-19. It was a brilliantly sunny day, so a funeral worker held an umbrella over Blumenstein to shield the laptop from any glare, as synagogue members and family members of the deceased sang and said prayers.

The experience was a “surreal” one for Blumenstein, who is a synagogue liaison at Dorot, a social-services organization that works with the elderly in the New York City area. “I felt really privileged that I could be there and be the person who was allowing this to be transmitted.”

The roughly 20-minute ceremony was one of countless funerals that have taken place over Zoom during the COVID-19 pandemic. As authorities limit the size of gatherings — and hospitals limit

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How much do retirement homes cost?

Edited Transcript of HFWA earnings conference call or presentation 30-Apr-20 6:00pm GMT

Olympia May 18, 2020 (Thomson StreetEvents) — Edited Transcript of Heritage Financial Corp earnings conference call or presentation Thursday, April 30, 2020 at 6:00:00pm GMT

* Bryan D. McDonald

* David A. Spurling

* Donald J. Hinson

* Jeffrey J. Deuel

D.A. Davidson & Co., Research Division – Senior VP & Senior Research Analyst

Okay. So the host speakers, you are in the main conference. (Operator Instructions)

Okay. Perfect. Thank you, Daniel. Welcome, everybody, who called in. This is Jeff Deuel, CEO of Heritage Financial. We’re very sorry for the mix up on the phone call. Apparently, we asked for a hosted call and got a general call. Fortunately, in today’s environment, we’re a lot more flexible than we used to be. So hopefully, you had some time to work on your e-mails while we got straightened out on our end. I’m going to jump into our presentation, and then … Read More

Larry Kramer, Playwright And AIDS Activist, Dies At 84

Larry Kramer, Playwright And AIDS Activist, Dies At 84

Playwright and AIDS activist Larry Kramer died Wednesday at the age of 84, his husband, David Webster, told The New York Times.

Kramer died of pneumonia, Webster said. Kramer, who was HIV positive, was best known for writing the 1985 play “The Normal Heart,” and for founding the Gay Men’s Health Crisis and ACT UP, organizations at the forefront of activism during the AIDS crisis.

ACT UP also confirmed Kramer’s death in a tweet Wednesday.

Throughout the 1980s, Kramer drew attention to the urgency of the AIDS epidemic by organizing large, dramatic and provocative protests in New York City. He was highly critical of government officials for not taking the crisis seriously as a public health emergency and for not working quickly enough to find treatments.

Among those drawing his ire was infectious diseases expert Anthony Fauci, who was heading up the federal government’s efforts to fight the disease at

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Here's how reporter Amanda Perelli keeps up with influencer culture and chases down scoops from social media's biggest names

Here’s how reporter Amanda Perelli keeps up with influencer culture and chases down scoops from social media’s biggest names

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Samantha Lee/Business Insider

Business Insider reporter Amanda Perelli spends a good amount of her day watching TikTok videos looking for how brands are using the app.
Business Insider reporter Amanda Perelli spends a good amount of her day watching TikTok videos looking for how brands are using the app.

Amanda Perelli

  • Business Insider is taking you behind the scenes of our best stories with our new series “The Inside Story.” 

  • This week, BI deputy executive editor Olivia Oran spoke to reporter Amanda Perelli, who covers what’s new in the business of YouTube, Instagram, and influencer culture at large. 

  • Perelli shares how she keeps up with the super-fast changing industry, why average people should care about influencers, and her own social media habits (lots of TikTok!). 

  • You can sign up for Amanda’s weekly newsletter “Influencer Dashboard” here.

Olivia Oran: Covering influencers is such a fascinating beat, particularly for someone just getting started in journalism. How’d you land such a cool area to cover?

Amanda Perelli: I applied for the YouTube

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Don't waste coronavirus tests on those already showing symptoms. There's a smarter way.

Don’t waste coronavirus tests on those already showing symptoms. There’s a smarter way.

Universal testing in the United States may be on the way, but it is not around the corner. Acknowledging that regrettable reality means that, in the meantime, we have to decide how to allocate wisely our scarce testing resources. Unfortunately, with limitations on testing we seem to be testing the wrong people for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19.

Most authoritative sources, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recommend testing people with symptoms. Though that sounds reasonable, it leads to squandering our testing resources on people who we already know are probably infected. Moreover, with high false negative rates from some of the tests, even a negative test in someone with classic symptoms should be assumed to be infected.

Until we can achieve universal testing, in order to control the spread of this virus, a better approach must be taken than the one in use today. Starting now,

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The CDC says coronavirus 'does not spread easily' on surfaces or objects. Here's what we know.

The CDC says coronavirus ‘does not spread easily’ on surfaces or objects. Here’s what we know.

Update: The CDC has since clarified guidelines on coronavirus and its spread on surfaces.

Recent guidance issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sheds  new light on how coronavirus spreads through surfaces.

Though there is the possibility that coronavirus could be transmitted by touching a surface — and then your nose, mouth or eyes — the likelihood of that is lower than person-to-person contact, which is believed to be the primary way coronavirus is transmitted. 

“COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning about how it spreads,” says the CDC’s recently updated guidelines. 

Dr. Manisha Juthani, an infectious disease doctor and associate professor of medicine at Yale University, told USA TODAY that plenty of concern has been focused on packages and groceries during the coronavirus pandemic.

“The CDC guidelines I believe are trying to reduce fear and paranoia about methods of transmission,” she said.

From

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Some Miami city parks will reopen Wednesday after COVID-19 shutdown. Here’s the list.

After two months of having to keep off the grass in Miami’s city parks, people itching to be in public green spaces will get their day Wednesday.

Miami will reopen 27 parks inside city limits for 12 hours a day, allowing people some of the city’s public spaces for the first time since the coronavirus pandemic spurred shutdowns in mid-March. Cities sought to curb the spread of COVID-19 by closing city properties.

Last week, Mayor Francis Suarez and mayors of other Miami-Dade cities announced they would begin to open some businesses and recreational spaces May 20, a few days after the county allowed a broad segment of retail establishments and restaurants to reopen. In explaining the decision, Suarez pointed to an analysis by Florida International University infectious disease and biostatistics experts that showed decreased infection rates and a slow, gradual decrease in key hospitalization metrics over a two-week period.

The

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<p>Robin Cohn snaps a selfie after a run to the top of Twin Peaks.

how 2 San Francisco women are covering the entire city on foot

Citywide

<p>Robin Cohn snaps a selfie after a run to the top of Twin Peaks. | Photo: Courtesy of Robin Cohn</p>

Robin Cohn snaps a selfie after a run to the top of Twin Peaks. | Photo: Courtesy of Robin Cohn

When Mayor London Breed announced the city’s shelter-in-place order in March, at least two San Francisco fitness buffs didn’t have to forgo their favorite workout routines due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

That’s because Robin Cohn and Jan Adams were already at work on the same project: attempting to cover the entire city on foot. More than two months into the citywide lockdown, they’re finding it’s possible to socially distance from others while staying on track with their respective goals.

For 56-year-old Cohn, who is retired, running every street, alley, staircase, and tiny pathway in San Francisco satisfies two of her natural tendencies. “I love variety,” she says. “And I like thoroughness.” 

Over the past 18 months, she’s run about 2,100 miles in San Francisco. In March, she hit the

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German choirs silenced as singing branded virus risk

German choirs silenced as singing branded virus risk

Berlin (AFP) – When the Berlin Cathedral Choir gathered for a rehearsal on March 9, the new coronavirus was still a distant concern, with fewer than 50 confirmed cases in the German capital.

But five days later, one of the ensemble’s 80 singers contacted choir director Tobias Brommann to say she had tested positive for COVID-19.

Within two weeks, around 30 members had tested positive and a further 30 were showing symptoms — including Brommann himself, who was struck down with a headache, cough and fever.

“We also can’t be sure if those without symptoms were not infected too, as we have not done antibody tests,” Brommann told AFP.

Hardly considered an extreme activity up to now, singing — especially choral singing — is quickly earning a reputation in the pandemic as about the most dangerous thing you can do.

Similar horror stories have emerged from choirs around the world,

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