Day: March 21, 2020

Has the U.S. Surgeon General Caught a Bad Case of Trumpism?

Has the U.S. Surgeon General Caught a Bad Case of Trumpism?

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photo Michael Brochstein / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photo Michael Brochstein / Echoes Wire/Barcroft Media via Getty

In normal times, the average American’s experience with the U.S. surgeon general amounts to reading the warnings on a packet of cigarettes or a bottle of alcohol. But in the age of the novel coronavirus, Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams has become a regular presence in living rooms—and, recently, not always the most reassuring one. 

On March 8, the first time many Americans saw Adams, the 45-year-old sat for an interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper. Adams, who holds the rank of vice admiral in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps and oversees 6,500 public health officers, explained the nature of coronavirus to Tapper as if he was one of his anesthesiology patients. But as Tapper pressed on to more political ground—whether the age of former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT),

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'Deluge' of Cases Begins Hitting Hospitals

‘Deluge’ of Cases Begins Hitting Hospitals

Outside Lenox Hill Hospital, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, March 14, 2020. (Gabby Jones/The New York Times)
Outside Lenox Hill Hospital, on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, March 14, 2020. (Gabby Jones/The New York Times)

NEW YORK — New York state’s long-feared surge of coronavirus cases has begun, thrusting the medical system toward a crisis point.

In a startlingly quick ascent, officials reported Friday that the state was closing in on 8,000 positive tests, about half the cases in the country. The number was 10 times higher than what was reported earlier in the week.

In the Bronx, doctors at Lincoln Medical and Mental Health Center say they have only a few remaining ventilators for patients who need them to breathe. In Brooklyn, doctors at Kings County Hospital Center say they are so low on supplies that they are reusing masks for up to a week, slathering them with hand sanitizer between shifts.

Some of the jump in New York’s cases can be traced to significantly

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People are stockpiling pot and sales are skyrocketing at dispensaries as the coronavirus pandemic sweeps the globe

People are stockpiling pot and sales are skyrocketing at dispensaries as the coronavirus pandemic sweeps the globe

People queue to buy marijuana at coffee shop Bullwackie in Amsterdam, Sunday, March 15, 2020, after a TV address of health minister Bruno Bruins who ordered all Dutch schools, cafés, restaurants, coffeeshops, and sport clubs to be closed on Sunday as the government sought to prevent the further spread of coronavirus in the Netherlands.
People queue to buy marijuana at coffee shop Bullwackie in Amsterdam, Sunday, March 15, 2020, after a TV address of health minister Bruno Bruins who ordered all Dutch schools, cafés, restaurants, coffeeshops, and sport clubs to be closed on Sunday as the government sought to prevent the further spread of coronavirus in the Netherlands.

AP Photo/Peter Dejong

People are stockpiling marijuana as the coronavirus pandemic forces everyone to hunker down in their homes, perhaps for a long time.

All around the world, there are pictures surfacing on social media of long lines outside of dispensaries. From Toronto to San Francisco to Amsterdam, cannabis products are flying off the shelves.

The old saying that vice industries — gambling, tobacco, alcohol, firearms — are recession-proof seems to apply to legal cannabis’s first big test.

‘Sales are through the roof’

Ross Lipson, the CEO of the Oregon-based online dispensary software startup Dutchie, told

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Coronavirus drives up demand - and pay

Coronavirus drives up demand – and pay

By Deena Beasley

(Reuters) – U.S. hospitals, bracing for a surge of coronavirus patients just as some staff are under quarantine after being exposed to the virus, are facing a shortage of temporary nurses who can fill in – and being asked to pay as much as double to make it worth it. So-called “travel nurses” total around 50,000 – or less than one percent of the nursing workforce – which represents an increase in recent years as the U.S. population ages, demand increases and workers seek more flexible employment options.

With the coronavirus outbreak escalating every day, the need for temporary nurses is growing exponentially throughout the United States.

But an “unprecedented number” are backing out of assignments because they do not want to travel in the midst of the crisis, said Alan Braynin, chief executive at staffing firm Aya Healthcare.

As staffing agencies have raised pay demands for

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Trump's breathless takes on drugs for virus

Trump’s breathless takes on drugs for virus

WASHINGTON (AP) — “Could be a game changer.” “Very exciting.” “The way they acted with this kind of speed is an incredible thing.” “Very powerful.” “This could be a tremendous breakthrough. Tremendous breakthrough.” “We’re going to be able to make that drug available almost immediately.” “There’s tremendous promise.”

That’s President Donald Trump, inflating expectations about an end game to the coronavirus crisis with his positive spin on a disease that is spreading with no federally approved drug treatments, no preventive medicine, no cure and not enough equipment to help everyone sick from it.

Trump commanded the daily coronavirus task force briefings at the White House this past week, fashioning himself as a wartime president and making a variety of statements about the pandemic that were problematic or just wrong.

The public health officials who were with him walked back some of those statements. Most strikingly, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of

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Inside Law Enforcement’s Coronavirus Slowdown

Inside Law Enforcement’s Coronavirus Slowdown

Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast
Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast

In Kenton County, a mid-sized Kentucky jurisdiction just across the river from Cincinnati, fears of the novel coronavirus have shown signs of paralyzing law enforcement. 

“Normally have anywhere from six to 20 felony arrests a day,” Rob Sanders, the top prosecutor in the county, told The Daily Beast on Friday. “Yesterday we had two: one for a warrant that was issued months ago and another for a methamphetamine case. The day before, we had one arrest all day.”

While the county of over 150,000 inhabitants only had one confirmed case of COVID-19 as of Thursday, Sanders said there had been “very little proactive policing” as a result of officers implementing CDC social distancing guidelines and growing anxiety over the pandemic.

“Police aren’t conducting routine traffic stops unless the driver is doing something to put others in danger,” Sanders said. “Police are not stopping as

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Recession fears hit Hollywood as work grinds to a halt

Recession fears hit Hollywood as work grinds to a halt

Hollywood stuntman and actor Mike Ferguson had just arrived in San Francisco last week to work on a Western when the cancellations started rolling in.

He watched the news unfold from a hotel room, each day bringing more urgency and more questions. When San Francisco declared a countywide shelter-in-place directive Monday, he had only a few hours to find a flight back to his wife and three daughters in Southern California.

Now, the 48-year-old is self-quarantined in his home for two weeks. He’s one of hundreds of thousands of entertainment industry workers out of a job as productions, releases and live events are canceled or postponed because of the coronavirus outbreak that has already sickened more than 1,000 Californians and more than 230,000 people worldwide as of Friday.

Like so many industries, Hollywood is taking a big hit during the public health crisis. Pilot season, a time when studios rush

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Mark Cavendish and the legend of Milan-San Remo

Mark Cavendish and the legend of Milan-San Remo

Procycling magazine: the best writing and photography from inside the world’s toughest sport. Pick up your copy now in all good newsagents and supermarkets, or get a Procycling subscription.

In December 2018 Mark Cavendish guest-edited an issue of Procycling. Among the subject matters he wanted the magazine to cover was Milan-San Remo, a race he won in 2009 and that he feels truly encapsulates what pro road racing is all about. This article was taken from Procycling magazine, issue 251.

That Mark Cavendish is still more focused on creating new material than compiling and admiring his Greatest Hits can be inferred from his suggestion that his guest-edited issue of Procycling should feature a homage to Milan-San Remo. Or rather, it can be discerned from the proviso that Cavendish immediately lays down: “I just don’t really want it to be about my San Remo. I don’t want everything

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What is essential and non-essential during a pandemic?

What is essential and non-essential during a pandemic?

With California, New York and Illinois ordering the closure of non-essential businesses and all non-essential workers to stay home – in an attempt to prevent the spread of the coronavirus – you might be asking yourself, “What is essential?”

Federal guidelines give state and local authorities leeway in what they consider essential businesses during an emergency. But in general, those industries identified as essential include grocery stores and food production, pharmacies, health care, utilities, shipping, banking, other governmental services, law enforcement and emergency personnel.

“The broad view is health care, obviously that is essential, sanitation (and) food is essential, and military is essential,” said Jerry Hathaway, a New York City attorney with Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath.

Need a job amid coronavirus crisis?: Walmart announces plan to add 150,000 employees to meet ‘demand in our stores’

Bed Bath & Beyond: Retailer to close half of its stores due to coronavirus

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For those who survived polio, coronavirus is eerily familiar. But ultimately, 'science won'.

For those who survived polio, coronavirus is eerily familiar. But ultimately, ‘science won’.

For many Americans, the novel coronavirus pandemic has generated illness-related fears that have little precedent in our lifetimes.

But 60 million Americans over the age of 70 have seen this horror show before: the polio scourge that ravaged the world’s young from roughly 1916 until Jonas Salk’s vaccination arrived in 1955.

Similarities between the epidemics that now bookend the lives of these seniors are many: Fear of an unseen enemy. Quarantined families. Social distancing. But one twist stands out.

“Today in a way is a reverse, because back then our parents were so worried for us kids and now it’s my kids who are so worried about me,” says Sue Gray, 84, who, because of COVID-19’s often deadly impact on seniors, now keeps her distance from Chicago neighbors during strolls in the park.

“But absolutely, when coronavirus hit, the first thing I thought of were those summers in the 1940s,

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