Day: March 30, 2020

Coronavirus ‘cures’ like gargling or using a sauna won’t help you. Here are the facts

Coronavirus ‘cures’ like gargling or using a sauna won’t help you. Here are the facts

As coronavirus cases rise across the United States, so too do reports of bogus, fake or just plain unhelpful homebrew remedies circulating online.

“We’re not just fighting an epidemic; we’re fighting an infodemic,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, general-director of the World Health Organization, the Los Angeles Times reports. “Fake news spreads faster and more easily than this virus, and is just as dangerous.”

More than 523,000 cases of the COVID-19 virus have been confirmed worldwide with more than 23,000 deaths as of March 26, according to Johns Hopkins University. The United States has more than 80,000 confirmed cases with more than 1,000 deaths.

The World Health Organization has declared coronavirus a global pandemic. The United States has declared a national emergency.

The most effective way to prevent coronavirus is to practice social distancing and wash your hands frequently with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds, says the

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How much do retirement homes cost?

How courts are handling coronavirus outbreak

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The new coronavirus pandemic has caused most aspects of American life to come to a halt – with states across the country ordering residents to stay inside and keep their distance from others unless absolutely necessary.

As of Thursday afternoon, at least 76,514 COVID-19 cases were reported nationwide, resulting in 1,093 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University and Medicine.

UNEXPECTED ‘ESSENTIAL BUSINESSES’ IDENTIFIED AMID CORONAVIRUS

As officials, regardless of region, continue to grapple with the effects of the pandemic, many have instituted changes in their court system as one way of further curtailing the spread. Here’s how courts in some of the most populated states nationwide have responded:

CALIFORNIA

California was the first state to take the drastic measure of effectively shutting down, asking residents to shelter in place unless they

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The real J.D. who inspired Scrubs is currently helping a coronavirus command center

The real J.D. who inspired Scrubs is currently helping a coronavirus command center

The story of doctor John Dorian ended after season 10 of Scrubs in 2010, but the person who inspired Zach Braff’s famous character is still on the medical front lines: and he’s helping those in need during the coronavirus pandemic.

On Thursday, Scrubs creator Bill Lawrence quote tweeted a man by the name of Jon Doris who said he was working at a COVID command center. A command center is typically a centralized location where health experts can strategize an adequate response for the area they’re in. If the name Jon Doris seems not far off from the name given to the daydreamer played by Braff, it’s because he was literally based on Doris. Lawrence was a friend of Doris when they went to school at the College of William & Mary.

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How to Exercise at Home During the Coronavirus

How to Exercise at Home During the Coronavirus

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For those of us who love the gym, the coronavirus pandemic has created a bit of separation anxiety. 

Gyms across the country—my own included—have shut their physical doors, some under orders from officials and others as a preventative response to the virus. Many are turning instead to online classes as a way to keep their clients engaged and fit.

Planet Fitness, for instance, is offering a daily free class via Facebook Live and is promoting paid workouts through its app. Crunch Fitness notes on its website that it has more than 85 workouts on its “Crunch Live” streaming platform. Even small local gyms such as Alpha Interval Training in White Plains, N.Y., are extending services to online classes, nutrition guidance, and competitions, using social channels such as Facebook to keep members and their families engaged and working out. 

For

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How to Manage Anxiety and Loneliness During the Coronavirus Pandemic

How to Manage Anxiety and Loneliness During the Coronavirus Pandemic

Between the constant news updates on the new coronavirus (COVID-19) and the loneliness that comes from social distancing or quarantining to slow its spread, current events can take a toll on mental health.

According to Google, searches for “loneliness” have now reached the highest level since it started tracking searches in 2004. While epidemiologists emphasize that social distancing — canceling events, closing schools, limiting person-to-person contact — is essential to reducing the spread of coronavirus and ease the pressure on healthcare services, it exacerbates the feeling of loneliness.

At the same time, coronavirus is inescapable, dominating conversations and news. Traditional methods of distraction and escape — such as sports and entertainment — are no longer an option, with every major sports league postponing their seasons, and restaurants, bars and theaters shutting down. And when beloved actors like Tom Hanks and Idris Elba get infected, it’s a reminder that no one

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Human beings are not walking dollar signs

Human beings are not walking dollar signs

If we are to settle on a single lesson from the coronavirus crisis, I hope it is this: Human beings are more than the sum of their economic contributions to society. We are more than walking dollar signs, and should be valued far above and beyond our ability to make a buck — or to produce a buck for somebody else.

People matter. Period.

That might seem fairly obvious to you, a moral or religious lesson learned in childhood. But many other Americans, and certainly many of our leaders in Washington, seem to subscribe to a different ideology. They cannot separate the idea of one’s “worth” from the proverbial bottom line.

This is why nursing homes have become vectors for illness, as my colleague Matthew Walther has pointed out. It is why so many prominent conservatives, including the president of the United States, want to ignore the coronavirus pandemic and

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10 ways the coronavirus pandemic could change American life as we know it

10 ways the coronavirus pandemic could change American life as we know it

Will we ever shake hands again?
Will we ever shake hands again?

AP Photo/Susan Walsh

  • In just one month, the coronavirus pandemic has caused swift and dramatic disruptions to life in the US as states resort to lockdowns and most people are confined to their homes for work, school, and leisure.

  • We wonder: How will this crisis change society in the long-run?

  • Historians and a futurist told Business Insider how they expect the coronavirus pandemic to reshape American life as we know it.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

There have been only a handful of scenarios in recent American memory that have caused sweeping changes to our culture, economy, and government.

For many Americans, the COVID-19 crisis is equal in weight to 9/11 or the 2008 economic recession — two historic events of the 21st Century that brought forth new policy initiatives and reshaped the way we travel, think, and protect ourselves as a

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Cardi B tells celebrities to stop getting fast-tracked coronavirus tests while the general public is being told there aren't enough

Cardi B tells celebrities to stop getting fast-tracked coronavirus tests while the general public is being told there aren’t enough

cardi b
cardi b

AP/Brent N. Clarke

  • Celebrities are getting hold of coronavirus tests and diagnoses faster than the general public.

  • Tom Hanks, plenty of NBA players, Idris Elba, and Prince Charles have all tested positive for the virus, while the general public in Australia, the US, and the UK have been told tests are extremely limited.

  • In response, rapper Cardi B shared an Instagram video urging the rich and famous not to get tests unless they show symptoms and they really need them.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Much-needed coronavirus tests are in short supply, but celebrities and high-profile athletes have had seemingly no problem getting their own tests, confusing the public about testing availability and protocols.

On Wednesday, rapper Cardi B shared an Instagram video to clear that confusion and dissuade the famous from getting tests unless they really need them.

In the four-minute video, Cardi said that celebrities

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40%-60% of Socially Active People to Get Coronavirus

40%-60% of Socially Active People to Get Coronavirus

Carsten Thiel, President of European Commercialization, EUSA Pharma

By CorpGov Staff

In recent months, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced the outbreak of a public health emergency of international concern – also known as the disease labeled COVID-19, or the Coronavirus.

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that can be commonly found in people and numerous different animal species. The virus rarely spreads from animals to people, or vice versa.

However, COVID-19 reports do spread mixed signals to our world’s population. Some sources claim that the initial spread did indeed happen through animal to person contact through a large seafood and live animal market in China. Later on, word spread that patients diagnosed with the coronavirus were not exposed to animal markets, and that person to person spread is how the virus continued to thrive amongst populations.

The coronavirus appears to spread from person to person

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US private health insurance companies clog system amid Covid-19 pandemic

US private health insurance companies clog system amid Covid-19 pandemic

<span>Photograph: Peter Foley/EPA</span>
Photograph: Peter Foley/EPA

As Augie Lindmark, a resident physician at Yale University prepared for an onslaught of Covid-19 patients last week, he noticed something at his hospital: there were still patients without the virus, completely stable, in the beds.

These patients, many of whom should have been moved to a rehab facility or released, were stuck waiting until their private health insurance company authorized the next steps, which can take days.

Related: The ER Diaries: inside a California hospital, a sneeze can cause a panic

Usually, the prior authorization process is an expected inefficiency at Yale, and most other American hospitals. But with thousands of Covid-19 patients being admitted every day across the country, and a critical shortage of hospital beds, that red tape now carries much more weight.

“Any sort of slowing in the health system has dire consequences,” Lindmark said.

In the past two weeks the reality of

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