Day: April 1, 2020

Should you wear a mask amid the coronavirus pandemic? Experts reconsider their advice

Should you wear a mask amid the coronavirus pandemic? Experts reconsider their advice

Broadening the use of face masks during the coronavirus pandemic has been a big topic of discussion among experts as more is learned about COVID-19 and how it spreads.

Health experts and officials in the U.S. have said since the beginning of the coronavirus outbreak that people who aren’t infected with the virus or caring for someone who is shouldn’t wear face masks. But as COVID-19 continues to spread and more is learned about it, some are starting to reconsider.

Surgeon General Jerome Adams wrote on Twitter on Wednesday that his office is asking the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to reconsider their guidelines on who should wear masks based on new data.

The guidelines outlined on the CDC’s website still say people who are aren’t sick shouldn’t wear a face mask unless they’re taking care of a sick person. People who are sick should wear masks when they’re

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Trump's push for risky malaria drugs disrupts coronavirus response

Trump’s push for risky malaria drugs disrupts coronavirus response

“It’s not the right thing to do, in the middle of a pandemic, to throw the kitchen sink — even guided by Oracle — at patients,” said Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at NYU.

Scientists are trying to answer some of the gaping questions about chloroquine: The World Health Organization is launching a global trial of the drug and other potential treatments, while New York state is enrolling patients in its own study this week.

“Using untested medicines without the right evidence will raise false hope and even do more harm than good — and cause a shortage of essential medicines that are needed to treat other diseases,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization.

But in the U.S., where Trump has taken to touting chloroquine’s “very powerful” abilities in press conferences, the president and Vice President Mike Pence are encouraging off-label use since the medicine is

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Does masturbation help your immune system? An orgasm may have benefits

Does masturbation help your immune system? An orgasm may have benefits

Masturbation has many of the same health benefits as sex with a partner.
Masturbation has many of the same health benefits as sex with a partner.

Crystal Cox/Business Insider

  • Some research has found that masturbation may help your immune system, and sex — whether solo or with a partner — is known to have health benefits. 

  • An orgasm, through masturbation or sex with a partner, can reduce stress and improve sleep quality. 

  • Masturbation is always the safest way to achieve sexual pleasure, and during the coronavirus outbreak, health officials are advising that ‘you are your safest sex partner.’

  • This article was medically reviewed by Tania Elliott, MD, who specializes in infectious diseases related to allergies and immunology for internal medicine at NYU Langone Health. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A healthy sex life is beneficial for the body and mind. In fact, it can reduce stress, lower blood pressure, and improve sleep. 

While research is extensive on the benefits of a

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UW model suggests mid-April peak for coronavirus in Washington state with scores more deaths

UW model suggests mid-April peak for coronavirus in Washington state with scores more deaths

As the state starts to gain a clearer picture of the coronavirus outbreak, the million-dollar question now on everyone’s mind: When is the outbreak going to peak?

New models released by the University of Washington”s Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation on Friday offer projections through the current coronavirus season, along with estimated peaks and death tolls for each state and the nation as a whole.

Researchers caution this is an ever-changing event, and estimates continue to change as more data are gathered.

For now, the model suggests Washington state will see peak strain on hospital resources about April 19 and an estimated 1,429 COVID-19 deaths statewide by July.

It projected 81,114 COVID-19 deaths nationwide by mid-July.

With the measures in place now, the state model does not project Washington exceeding total hospital bed capacity, though some facilities will be strained more than others. For intensive care units, it does

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Is Los Angeles facing New York-level coronavirus disaster? Here is what we know

Is Los Angeles facing New York-level coronavirus disaster? Here is what we know

WESTWOOD, CA, MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2020 - Healthcare workers gather outside UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center to call for further action from the federal government's in reaction to the Covid 19 outbreak. (Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times) <span class="copyright">(Robert Gauthier/Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times)</span>
WESTWOOD, CA, MONDAY, MARCH 30, 2020 – Healthcare workers gather outside UCLA Ronald Reagan Medical Center to call for further action from the federal government’s in reaction to the Covid 19 outbreak. (Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times) (Robert Gauthier/Robert Gauthier/Los Angeles Times)

Is Los Angeles going to be the next New York when it comes to coronavirus?

Coronavirus cases have risen dramatically over the last week, and officials warn that things will get much worse in the next few weeks.

“A week or two from now, we will have images like we’re seeing in New York here in Los Angeles.” Mayor Eric Garcetti said Thursday

It will be bad — but how bad remains a question.

L.A. vs. New York

The mortality rate in L.A. County is about 1.8%, which is higher than the mortality rate in New York City and the United States overall, Ferrer said.

One factor in that

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At some U.S. hospitals, drugs, catheters, oxygen tanks run low

At some U.S. hospitals, drugs, catheters, oxygen tanks run low

By Joseph Ax and Jonathan Allen

NEW YORK (Reuters) – It’s not just protective facemasks that are in short supply: health workers in U.S. hospitals are reporting dwindling stocks of drugs, catheters and other medical miscellany vital for caring for a surge in patients stricken by the coronavirus outbreak.

Marney Gruber, a doctor who works in emergency rooms around New York City, said a number of commonly used medications are in short supply, and at least one hospital had run out of central line kits, which are used to administer drugs to patients in intensive care.

“Never ever before have I heard of that being an issue,” Gruber said in an interview on Friday. “These are staples in emergency medicine and ICUs. These are your bread and butter, truly, your very basic essentials.”

Hospitals have quickly begun to strain under the surge as the city has become the global epicenter

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What is a super-spreader and how do they change disease outbreaks?

What is a super-spreader and how do they change disease outbreaks?

One of the first confirmed coronavirus cases in the UK was a man from Brighton who was deemed a “super-spreader” after passing the virus on to six or seven people.

This pattern of transmission from one individual to many others is unusual; so far coronavirus has only seen an average of two or three people infected for every patient.

So why do some people spread viruses to a greater number of people than others, what makes them a super-spreader, and is this a useful medical term or just a way to demonise an individual for something arguably out of their control?

What is a super-spreader?

Although not strictly defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO), a super-spreader is generally taken to refer to a patient who infects significantly more people with a disease than usual.

So far with coronavirus we have seen an average of two or three people infected

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Military Medical School to Graduate Students Early, Rush to COVID-19 Response

Military Medical School to Graduate Students Early, Rush to COVID-19 Response

For the first time in its 48-year history, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences will graduate its fourth-year medical school students and graduate-level nurses early to support the U.S. military’s war on COVID-19.

Roughly 170 medical students and 60 graduate nursing students will depart USUHS in Bethesda, Maryland, between April 1 and April 17, to support the Defense Department’s coronavirus pandemic response.

The medical students, who are not yet licensed because they have not completed the required internships, will work under the supervision of licensed physicians in positions “appropriate within the limits of their duty stations,” such as screening patients and taking health histories, USUHS President Dr. Richard Thomas said in an interview Thursday with Military.com.

The nurses — all of whom have experience and will graduate with advanced degrees — will proceed directly to their assigned duty stations.

“For COVID-19, there’s a lot of extra work for

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These identical quadruplets were born during the coronavirus pandemic

These identical quadruplets were born during the coronavirus pandemic

Amid quarantines and closings and the unknowns of the novel coronavirus pandemic, a Minnesota family is celebrating a small miracle, growing the size of their family by four.

Taylor Becher and Lance Thompson, of Albertville, Minnesota, welcomed identical quadruplet daughters Sawyer, Kennedy, Lakely and Aurora Thompson on March 11 just as the novel coronavirus was spreading throughout the United States, forcing hospitals to close their doors to visitors and in some cases forcing moms to give birth without anyone by their side.

PHOTO: Taylor Becher, of Minnesota, holds her identical quadruplet daughters who were born on March 11, 2020. (Courtesy Taylor Becher)

Thompson was allowed in the delivery room but visitors are no longer allowed in the hospital. The couple’s 22-month-old son Linden has not yet met his sisters.

MORE: Expectant moms share concerns over giving birth amid the coronavirus

“It’s hard,” Becher told “Good Morning America.” “And they’re

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Here is where you can and can’t go under North Carolina’s ‘stay at home’ order

On Monday at 5 p.m., North Carolina starts a new life under stay-at-home restrictions.

Friday afternoon, Gov. Roy Cooper announced a statewide stay-at-home order. Wake County, Durham and Orange County already follow similar rules.

So what does this mean? Can I still get groceries, go jogging, buy a book, change my oil? Yes, yes, yes and yes.

But it’s complicated.

Here is a breakdown of how Cooper’s announcement will change your routine.

For more frequently asked questions, the governor’s office provides this FAQ.

How long will the order last?

The order takes effect Monday, March 30, at 5 p.m. It will be in effect for 30 days, until April 29, but “can be revised or extended.” The order is mandatory.

What will remain open in North Carolina?

For a snapshot, here is what will remain open, according to a press release from the governor’s office: “Restaurants that provide take-out, drive-thru

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