Day: April 3, 2020

U.S. dairy farmers dump milk as pandemic upends food markets

Cannabis Opportunity In The Time Of The Coronavirus

During the great American lockdown, marijuana sales are generally up, providing an opportunity for the industry. In most states, cannabis has been deemed, like alcohol, an essential service. This has been a financial boom for retailers and their investors and led to an uptick in sales for product companies.

Canopy Growth (NYSE: CGC), which is tied to Constellation Brands (NYSE: STZ), is seeing a slight rebound of their stock, as their liquor, beer, wine, and cannabis sales are very healthy. This gives the cannabis industry a window to gain larger acceptance with the consumer public. Millions of Americans are looking for something today to provide some mental relief. Medical marijuana can be used to help ease anxiety and help manage stress in an uncertain world.

“What’s important is that cannabis is considered a medicine, and people need access to the medicine during this time,” said Chanda Macias, of the Washington,

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Docs Buck Bosses to Beg Cuomo for Coronavirus Protective Gear

Docs Buck Bosses to Beg Cuomo for Coronavirus Protective Gear

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty
Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast/Getty

Shortages of personal protective equipment in some New York City medical facilities have grown so dire that health-care professionals are bucking directives from their executives to reuse gear and making an end-run at Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office to plead for additional supplies.

Over the past two weeks, a handful of New York health-care executives told state representatives—including those in Cuomo’s office—that they were not running low on personal protective equipment (PPE) because they implemented protocols directing staff to reuse items like face masks and gowns when treating COVID-19 patients, according to three individuals familiar with the conversations. Executives said they drafted those protocols, which include sanitization of personal protective gear, based on guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), those sources said.

But the lack of protective gear and the restrictions on the stockpiles have forced some health-care professionals in the

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Money carries a whole host of germs, so wash your hands after handling currency

Money carries a whole host of germs, so wash your hands after handling currency

Money changes hands so much that it inevitably picks up pathogens along the way.
Money changes hands so much that it inevitably picks up pathogens along the way.

Anton Petrus/Getty Images

You never know where bills and coins have been, or what kind of germs money is carrying. As it turns out, anything from benign bacteria to dangerous superbugs could be catching a ride on your currency.

Here’s what you need to know about the germs on money and what you can do to protect yourself.

Money can spread germs from person to person

Money can carry viruses, protozoa, and bacteria. Depending on where it’s been, it could carry almost anything. One old and widely-cited study even found that 79% of one-dollar bills contain traces of cocaine. 

Another study of dollar bills in New York City found a whole host of active microbes, the most common of which was propionibacterium acnes, the bacteria responsible for acne breakouts. The researchers analyzed a set of one

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Canada needs to relax rules on foreign-trained physicians

Canada needs to relax rules on foreign-trained physicians

An infection control epidemiologist believes it may be the opportune time for the Canadian health system to be flexible and integrate foreign physicians who may not have gained licenses in Canada.

“We can’t manufacture doctors, we can’t manufacture nurses, we have these experts and we should make use of them, because the situation will become extremely desperate soon,” said Furness, an assistant professor of information in health policy at the University of Toronto.

Last week, the Irish Medical Council told government officials they should incorporate refugee and asylum seekers who were trained as doctors in their home countries, but not in Ireland.

Much like Canada, the council insisted their priority was to bring back retired doctors first, but noted that these doctors could provide “essential support” to their efforts of fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.

Provinces across Canada announced they’re already moving towards bringing back retired nurses and doctors back to

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What does a stay-at-home order really mean?

What does a stay-at-home order really mean?

Since the coronavirus began to spread in the U.S. in February, the federal government and state authorities alike have asked residents only to leave their homes if necessary. At last count, all but five states have issued lockdown orders, NBC News reports.

These stay-at-home directives — which vary by state but generally permit seeking health care, grocery shopping, picking up medicine, caring for loved ones and outdoor exercise — have been met with mixed results across the country.

When Floridians and tourists continued to hang out on beaches in late March, local officials had to close them down. Last week police in New Jersey broke up a house party of 47 people in a small apartment.

People are also continuing with other less obviously risky behaviors, such as visiting family and meeting friends outdoors. So what activities are OK during the coronavirus outbreak, and which are dangerous?

Here Dr. William

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Tiger King and Southern Patriarchy

Tiger King’s Joe Exotic Files $94 Million Lawsuit Against US Government

The post Tiger King’s Joe Exotic Files $94 Million Lawsuit Against US Government appeared first on Consequence of Sound.

Netflix has a certifiable viral hit on their hands in Tiger King: Murder, Mayhem and Madness, the true crime documentary series about Joseph “Joe Exotic” Maldonado-Passage. Now it seems the subject himself is trying to capitalize on the spike in interest in his case by suing a pair of government agencies plus his former business partner, Jeffrey Lowe, for a cumulative $95 million in damages.

According to PEOPLE, which obtained a copy of the lawsuit, the imprisoned former Oklahoma zookeeper and country music wannabe is suing the US Department of Interior, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and a number of government agents. In addition to claims of civil rights violations, Maldonado-Passage is seeking $73,840,000 for loss of personal property, 18 years of research, and the care of 200

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not the outbreak itself, but rather the US's lackluster response

not the outbreak itself, but rather the US’s lackluster response

Kaylah Jenkins dons personal protective equipment during infection-control training aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort as the vessel transits the Atlantic Ocean on its way to New York City in support of COVID-19 response efforts.
Kaylah Jenkins dons personal protective equipment during infection-control training aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort as the vessel transits the Atlantic Ocean on its way to New York City in support of COVID-19 response efforts.

US Navy via Getty Images

  • Three disease experts told Business Insider that they weren’t shocked by the emergence of a contagious new strain of coronavirus. 

  • They said the biggest surprise has been the “lack of coordinated public-health response” in the US, which led to a shortage of tests and an incomplete patchwork of shelter-in-place orders.

  • Officials should have been “thinking about quality controlling test kits, ramping [up] production of tests, thinking about hospital capacity,” one expert said.

  • After downplaying the threat of the coronavirus, President Trump now estimates that it could kill 100,000 to 240,000 people in the US.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The emergence of a novel coronavirus didn’t surprise Meghan

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Rep. Eric Swalwell (CA-15) will hold a Facebook Live Q&A on Thursday, April 2.

Swalwell Sets Coronavirus Q&A With Pediatric Doctor

CASTRO VALLEY, CA — Rep. Eric Swalwell (CA-15) is hosting a Facebook Live Q&A on Thursday, April 2 with guest Dr. Yvonne Maldonado, chief of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Stanford University School of Medicine.

The Q&A will begin at 1:30 p.m., and participants may submit questions in advance on the event’s Facebook page here.

“These uncertain times call for new ways to get information out to the public,”Swalwell said, “and I am thrilled Dr. Maldonado will be joining me for what will undoubtedly be another informative, useful conversation on COVID-19 and what 15th Congressional District residents need to know.”

Maldonado, is a professor in the Departments of Pediatrics and Health Research and Policy, chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases, and senior associate dean for Faculty Development and Diversity at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Her research activities have included the epidemiology and prevention of viral infections

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AI tool predicts which coronavirus patients get deadly 'wet lung'

AI tool predicts which coronavirus patients get deadly ‘wet lung’

Washington (AFP) – Researchers in the US and China reported Monday they have developed an artificial intelligence tool that is able to accurately predict which newly infected patients with the novel coronavirus go on to develop severe lung disease.

Once deployed, the algorithm could assist doctors in making choices about where to prioritize care in resource-stretched health care systems, said Megan Coffee, a physician and professor at New York University’s Grossman School of Medicine who co-authored a paper on the finding in the journal Computers, Materials & Continua.

The tool discovered several surprising indicators that were most strongly predictive of who went on to develop so-called acute respiratory disease syndrome (ARDS), a severe complication of the COVID-19 illness that fills the lungs with fluid and kills around 50 percent of coronavirus patients who get it.

The team applied a machine learning algorithm to data from 53 coronavirus patients across two

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I Got Novel Coronavirus on a Cruise and the Symptoms Were Intense

I Got Novel Coronavirus on a Cruise and the Symptoms Were Intense

This article was medically reviewed by Raj Dasgupta, M.D., an assistant professor of clinical medicine and a member of the Prevention Medical Review Board, on March 30, 2020.

My husband Anthony and I were two of the first confirmed coronavirus cases in Nashville, where we live. We were lucky. As of today, it’s been more than two weeks since exposure and a week without symptoms. I’m sharing my story publicly because I think it’s important to put a face to this pandemic—and to show everyone this thing has an ending, even if it takes longer than we would hope. I’ve seen too many people talking about COVID-19 as if it’s a hypothetical or a “not really happening here” type of situation. Let me tell you, it is very much real. It is happening where you are. And it is not playing around. Let’s keep flattening the curve, while pushing

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