Month: May 2020

Front-line doctors face a mental health crisis amid coronavirus. Can medicine overcome the culture of stoicism?

Front-line doctors face a mental health crisis amid coronavirus. Can medicine overcome the culture of stoicism?

The coronavirus pandemic has taken a toll on the American psyche, with a third of Americans now showing signs of clinical depression or anxiety, a rate twice as high as before the pandemic, according to Census Bureau data. Those grim statistics are likely even more dire for the health care workers on the front lines of the crisis, experts say.

While it’s too early to truly quantify the effect that treating patients under combat-like conditions will have on doctors in the coming months or years, preliminary research out of China highlights the mental health risk that American health care workers potentially face.

Of more than 1,200 health care workers surveyed in China, roughly half showed symptoms of depression or anxiety, according to a JAMA Network Open article published in March. More than a third of those surveyed reported insomnia. Some 70% said they were distressed. Nurses, women, health workers who … Read More

India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

How should cruise companies protect passengers and crew from COVID-19? We asked doctors

The world’s four largest cruise companies plan to hit the high seas later this summer. For Carnival Corporation, Royal Caribbean Cruises Ltd. and Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings, that means August 1. MSC Cruises plans to relaunch even sooner — mid-July.

But none of the companies has announced how it will protect passengers and crew from COVID-19 before a vaccine becomes available, at least a year from now. To date, the infectious disease has been confirmed in more than 3,000 passengers and crew and at least 82 deaths across 63 cruise ships, according to a Miami Herald investigation.

Carnival Corp., the world’s largest cruise company with nine brands and 104 ships, is still working on its procedures, said spokesperson Roger Frizzell.

“It is still early in the process and our brands have not yet finalized our future protocol for when the ships will return to cruising following our pause,” he said

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Adele at the 54th annual Grammy Awards.

Adele’s Fitness Trainer Reveals How He Kept Her Motivated

Adele is one of the most iconic singers of the past several decades, well-known for her soaring ballads “Someone Like You” and “Rolling in the Deep.” For the past several years, Adele has been noticeably absent from the music scene, as she dealt with some issues in her personal life, including a divorce from her longtime partner, Simon Konecki. However, rumors that the singer could soon be making a massive comeback have been swirling, and recent pictures of the slimmed-down star made some serious waves on social media. Recently, her trainer spoke out about her weight loss, and how he kept Adele motivated throughout the process. 

How did Adele become famous?

RELATED: Adele Is Now Friends With the Royal Prince She Once Had a Massive Crush On

Adele was born in London in 1988. Raised primarily by her mother since she was a toddler, Adele became interested in singing and

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24 Hour Fitness reportedly preparing for bankruptcy filing

24 Hour Fitness reportedly preparing for bankruptcy filing

Gym chain 24 Hour Fitness Worldwide is reportedly preparing to file for bankruptcy, as retailers and other companies navigate the coronavirus pandemic.

According to The Wall Street Journal and Bloomberg, the company is seeking a loan to allow them to keep operating through a restructuring.

The company has more than $1.3 billion in debt after a buyout by AEA Investors and the Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan, reports Bloomberg.

The company based in San Ramon, Calif., operates more than 430 clubs across the country. The Journal reports 24 Hour Fitness plans to close some gyms permanently.

In a statement obtained by USA TODAY, 24 Hour Fitness says they look forward to continue reopening clubs nationwide as coronavirus restrictions are lifted.

“We are considering a broad range of options to ensure the long term sustainability and success of 24 Hour Fitness and we are not going to comment publicly on our strategic

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Thumbnail for The healthy pantry foods a functional medicine doctor always keeps on hand

Healthy pantry staples a top doctor always has on hand

The same way it would be hard to resist peeking inside a dermatologist’s medicine cabinet to see the skin-care products she *really* uses, it’s only natural to wonder what foods doctors keep in their kitchens. I mean, if your day job involves exploring the relationship between diet and health, surely those findings seep over into your personal life, right?

Well, you can stop wondering what functional medicine doctor and Food Fix author Mark Hyman, MD keeps in his kitchen. He recently shared a list of the pantry items he always has on hand to his Instagram, none of which are particularly exotic or hard to find. “Cooking is the best thing you can do for your health and your budget, and it’s fun,” Dr. Hyman wrote in the caption. “And what makes it even easier, is when you have the basic pantry items to create a simple, fast, and tasty

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How accurate is your commercial fitness tracker?

How accurate is your commercial fitness tracker?

In a 2019 study, 18 senior citizens took a stroll on some treadmills while armed to the hilt with fitness trackers. They had devices strapped to their wrists and ankles, fastened to their belts, and wrapped around their chests. But even with all these trackers, the seniors couldn’t get an accurate step count because their movements were too slow to trigger the sensors in the devices.

Commercial fitness trackers are being used for all kinds of things other than tracking steps. They measure heart rate, track sleep patterns, and calculate basal metabolic rate and calories burned. They’re used in clinical trials, research labs, and by insurance companies and corporate wellness programs.

But are they really reliable enough?

There are various ways your fitness tracker could go wrong, especially if you don’t fit into a fairly narrow demographic: light skin tone, in your 20s or 30s, with an average fitness level

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The anti-vax movement is using growing hesitation around the coronavirus vaccine to attract more people

The anti-vax movement is using growing hesitation around the coronavirus vaccine to attract more people

In this May 4, 2020 photo from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial receives an injection.
In this May 4, 2020 photo from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, the first patient enrolled in Pfizer’s COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial receives an injection.

Associated Press

  • Some recent surveys suggest Americans, especially young ones, are wary of a coronavirus vaccine.

  • The anti-vaccine movement is capitalizing on this skepticism, including at a recent in-person conference held in North Carolina. 

  • Top scientific experts have said an effective, widely-used vaccine is the “only hope” at eliminating the coronavirus and achieving herd immunity quickly. 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As scientists around the world race to develop a vaccine to fight the novel coronavirus, some Americans are still skeptical. 

A poll published May 27 found that only about half of Americans would get a coronavirus vaccine, should one become available, while 31% were unsure. One in five said they’d flat-out refuse, according the poll of 1,056 adults from

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Vaccine and coronavirus skeptics packed into a hotel for a conference over Memorial Day weekend, defying guidelines

Vaccine and coronavirus skeptics packed into a hotel for a conference over Memorial Day weekend, defying guidelines

Homeopathic practitioner Robert Bell speaks at the Advanced Medicine Conference.
Homeopathic practitioner Robert Bell speaks at the Advanced Medicine Conference.

Andie Rea

  • About 200 vaccine and coronavirus skeptics gathered in a North Carolina hotel for a conference over Memorial Day weekend. 

  • Attendees did not wear masks, practice social distancing, or heed the governor’s guidelines to limit gatherings to 10 people. 

  • The hotel ended up calling the local police to help enforce social distancing policies.  

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

As many Americans weighed the risks of going to the beach and backyard barbecues over Memorial Day weekend, hundreds of coronavirus and vaccine skeptics gathered in a Charlotte, North Carolina, hotel. 

“The Advanced Medicine Conference” attracted about 200 nonconventional medicine practitioners, researchers, anti-vaccine advocates, and members of the public, based on the best estimates of Business Insider Today, which sent a videographer to help conduct interviews.

Very few attendees wore masks, and the group didn’t comply with local guidelines

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As states reopen, medical experts recommend pregnant women stay vigilant against COVID-19

As states reopen, medical experts recommend pregnant women stay vigilant against COVID-19

Cherie Smith’s been outside her Highlands Ranch, Colorado, home and car just once since March 26. That was for an April 16 appointment with her obstetrician. 

The office’s “super caring” nurses take turns trying to convince Smith to come in for more in-person appointments because a surgery last year puts her at higher risk of premature labor. She’s more worried about COVID-19 though, and is on track for a June 20 cesarean section.

A new study of pregnant patients with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, gave expectant mothers a potential new reason to worry. It found higher rates of injury and blood clots in the placenta due to inadequate blood flow from the mother.The placenta is an organ that forms to provide oxygen and nutrients to the fetus and removes waste products from the baby’s blood.

But even the Northwestern University Medicine researchers who conducted the study

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'Prudent' to have Army units ready to deploy to Minnesota, governor says

‘Prudent’ to have Army units ready to deploy to Minnesota, governor says

The death of George Floyd, a black man who was seen pinned down in a video by a white police officer and later died, has caused outrage in the city of Minneapolis and across the United States. What started as mostly peaceful protests at the beginning of the week has turned into chaos.

City leaders have pleaded with communities to voice their outrage in a lawful manner, but the widespread escalation of protests continued Friday night into Saturday.

Murder and manslaughter charges have been filed against Derek Chauvin, one of the four officers at the scene, who were all fired. The Department of Justice has said a full investigation of the incident is a “top priority.”

Prosecutors said Chauvin, who was the officer seen in video pressing his knee against Floyd’s neck, had his knee on Floyd’s neck for 8 minutes and 46 seconds. Floyd was unresponsive for two minutes

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