Tag: CDC

The CDC says coronavirus 'does not spread easily' on surfaces or objects. Here's what we know.

The CDC says coronavirus ‘does not spread easily’ on surfaces or objects. Here’s what we know.

Update: The CDC has since clarified guidelines on coronavirus and its spread on surfaces.

Recent guidance issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sheds  new light on how coronavirus spreads through surfaces.

Though there is the possibility that coronavirus could be transmitted by touching a surface — and then your nose, mouth or eyes — the likelihood of that is lower than person-to-person contact, which is believed to be the primary way coronavirus is transmitted. 

“COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning about how it spreads,” says the CDC’s recently updated guidelines. 

Dr. Manisha Juthani, an infectious disease doctor and associate professor of medicine at Yale University, told USA TODAY that plenty of concern has been focused on packages and groceries during the coronavirus pandemic.

“The CDC guidelines I believe are trying to reduce fear and paranoia about methods of transmission,” she said.

From

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The New York Times said a senior reporter 'went too far' after he slammed Trump and said the CDC director should resign

The New York Times said a senior reporter ‘went too far’ after he slammed Trump and said the CDC director should resign

Donald G. McNeil Jr, a science reporter for The New York Times, appeared on CNN on Tuesday.
Donald G. McNeil Jr, a science reporter for The New York Times, appeared on CNN on Tuesday.

CNN

The New York Times says a senior reporter “went too far” in publicly slamming President Donald Trump and calling on the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to step down.

In a Tuesday interview, the science and health reporter Donald G. McNeil Jr. told the CNN host Christiane Amanpour that the US had only itself to blame for a woeful response to the coronavirus outbreak.

“We completely blew it for the first two months of our response,” McNeil said. “We were in a ‘headless chicken’ phase.”

“It is the president’s fault,” he added. “It is not China’s fault.”

McNeil also called for the resignation of Robert Redfield, the CDC’s director.

“We fiddled around for two months,” he said. “We had a test on March 5, and it didn’t work.

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Coronavirus deaths 'likely to continue to rise' in coming weeks, CDC says

Coronavirus deaths ‘likely to continue to rise’ in coming weeks, CDC says

A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 215,000 people worldwide.

More than 3 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some governments are hiding the scope of their nations’ outbreaks.

Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the United States has become the worst-affected country, with more than 1 million diagnosed cases and at least 58,365 deaths.

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

Deaths in US … Read More

The CDC added 6 more COVID-19 symptoms to its list. Here's every symptom linked to the disease and how common each is.

The CDC added 6 more COVID-19 symptoms to its list. Here’s every symptom linked to the disease and how common each is.

coronavirus
coronavirus

Getty

  • The CDC added 6 new symptoms — including muscle pain, sore throat, and loss of taste or smell — to its list of COVID-19 symptoms.

  • Fever and cough still appear to be the most common symptoms of COVID-19, but shortness of breath is often the most dangerous.

  • The CDC also outlines four “emergency signs” that warrant an immediate medical attention, including bluish lips and chest pain.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When the novel coronavirus was first identified in China, patients seemed to develop at least one of three symptoms: fever, a dry cough, and shortness of breath. The data was skewed, however, by the fact that most patients being tested for the virus had severe cases that required hospitalization.

As the virus spread and grew into a pandemic, doctors detected additional symptoms among patients — including among mild or moderate cases. 

The US Centers for

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CDC website drops guidance, anecdotal data on Trump-backed hydroxychloroquine as COVID-19 treatment

CDC website drops guidance, anecdotal data on Trump-backed hydroxychloroquine as COVID-19 treatment

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has abruptly switched its guidance for use of a drug touted by President Donald Trump as a possible treatment for COVID-19, dropping its reference to anecdotal dosages to say simply that there are no approved drugs for dealing with the disease.

The CDC’s online advice for hydroxychloroquine was updated April 7, three days after Reuters reported that the CDC was offering what the news agency called “highly unusual guidance” for the drug’s use based on “unattributed anecdotes rather than peer-reviewed science.”

The updated, and shortened, guidance says simply that “hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine are under investigation in clinical trials” for use on coronavirus patients and “there are no drugs or other therapeutics approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to prevent or treat COVID-19.”

The CDC originally told Reuters that the earlier guidance was crafted for doctors at the request of a

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Homemade mask sellers get creative as the CDC sets new guidelines to stop spread of coronavirus

Homemade mask sellers get creative as the CDC sets new guidelines to stop spread of coronavirus

Even before the Trump administration said people could start wearing face masks in public to stop the spread of the coronavirus, mask makers had taken matters into their own hands.

“Knowing they can’t get medical masks, people still have to get something as that first line of protection,” Collette Taylor, who runs an Etsy shop, told USA TODAY.

“People are listening to the news and just want to have that protection for them and their family.”

Senior officials at the Centers for Disease Control recommended to the White House this week that stronger guidelines were necessary to prevent the virus from spreading between asymptomatic people.

E-commerce website Etsy, which focuses on handmade items, has seen a significant demand for fabric face masks, according to company CEO Josh Silverman. On Friday, Etsy encouraged sellers on its platform to consider creating and selling face masks on their website.

DIY face masks: Where

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COVID-19 doctors running out of masks? Try a bandanna, the CDC says

COVID-19 doctors running out of masks? Try a bandanna, the CDC says

A doctor wears a face mask as a precautionary measure against the spread of the new coronavirus as she waits for patients. <span class="copyright">(Inti Ocon / AFP/Getty Images)</span>
A doctor wears a face mask as a precautionary measure against the spread of the new coronavirus as she waits for patients. (Inti Ocon / AFP/Getty Images)

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has new advice for medical workers desperate for protective gear against COVID-19: Try a bandanna for protection.

The agency, scrambling to advise healthcare workers faced with severe shortages of gear, also recommends that another “last resort” solution could be a scarf.

“Caution should be exercised,” the CDC warns about matching up a house cloth against the new coronavirus. “Their capability to protect [medical workers] is unknown.”

It’s the latest tip from an increasingly beleaguered agency that continues to loosen safety guidelines, even as coronavirus infections rise.

“It’s all incredibly disturbing to me. I’ve just been shocked at the CDC’s fall-down,” said Beth Hasenauer, a former pediatric oncology nurse in Monrovia, Calif., who plans to sew

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