Tag: COVID19

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7 Kinds of COVID-19 Relief for College Students

Colleges nationwide are closing their doors and moving to online-only learning amid the coronavirus pandemic. If you’re left in the lurch, the federal stimulus provides some student loan relief, but you’ll want to turn to your college for answers, too.

All students with federal loans qualify to delay payments, interest-free, through September. Some private lenders are offering forbearance as well.

Here is additional financial help that may be available to college students.

Independent students can get a stimulus check

Under the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act, most undergraduate college students will not receive a stimulus check. That’s because your parents might have claimed you as a dependent on their tax return, and dependents don’t qualify. Most students under age 24 are considered dependents.

But students who are independent — like many graduate students and undergraduates older than 24 — will get the full $1,200 one-time amount if they

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Justice Ginsburg continues 'essential' Supreme Court workouts during COVID-19 threat

Justice Ginsburg continues ‘essential’ Supreme Court workouts during COVID-19 threat

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg isn’t letting COVID-19 disrupt her world famous workouts.

The 87-year-old justice is still doing her planks and leg lifts inside the US Supreme Court at a “limited private space” set up for exercise at her request, spokeswoman Kathy Arberg confirmed to ABC News.

The Court’s regular fitness facility for the justices and staff has been closed to conform with social-distancing guidelines imposed by public health officials.

“Her doctors share her view that the training sessions are essential to her well-being,” Arberg said in a statement explaining the arrangement. “The space is being used exclusively by the Justice.”

Late last year, Ginsburg, the high court’s oldest member and celebrated feminist icon, was briefly hospitalized for a “stomach bug,” just weeks after undergoing treatment for a recurrence of pancreatic cancer.

In a January interview with CNN, Ginsburg said, “I’m cancer-free. That’s good.”

Throughout her health battles, Ginsburg has

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After a tiger in the Bronx zoo tested positive for COVID-19 many are wondering again if pets, like dogs and cats, are susceptible to the coronavirus. Here's what an expert has to say.

Can pets get coronavirus? What to know after tiger’s COVID-19 positive

Animal lovers across America were unnerved after it was announced Sunday that a tiger in New York’s Bronx Zoo tested positive for the coronavirus. Nadia, a Malayan tiger, was diagnosed with COVID-19 after showing symptoms of a dry cough and loss of appetite. Several other tigers and lions have shown symptoms of respiratory illness and are presumed infected.

Although some experts say it’s unlikely pets can get or transmit COVID-19, Yahoo Lifestyle spoke with Dr. Tracey McNamara, former chief pathologist at the Bronx Zoo, to get some answers. Dr. McNamara played a crucial role in investigating 1999’s West Nile virus outbreak and was also a scientific adviser on the 2011 film Contagion. She tells Yahoo Lifestyle she is “not at all” surprised a tiger tested positive.

“That brings up all sorts of issues that I’ve been trying to address for two months. When you’re dealing with a new disease

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Gilead Generates Street Skepticism Ahead of Covid-19 Results

Gilead Generates Street Skepticism Ahead of Covid-19 Results

(Bloomberg) —

Results from a study of Gilead Sciences Inc.’s experimental Covid-19 medicine are top-of-mind for Wall Street as cases surpass 1.35 million and deaths approach 76,000.

With a potential vaccine more than a year away, Gilead’s antiviral remdesivir offers one of the nearest-term hopes for a treatment in the pandemic that’s sweeping across the globe and putting many countries, including most of the U.S., on lockdown. Results from late-stage studies out of China are expected this month with results from U.S. trials following in May.

After the company’s valuation surged more than $20 billion from late January to early March, some Wall Street analysts are cautioning there may not be much more room for shares to gain. The stock has traded sideways since hitting a two-year high on March 6.

“We see a highly negatively skewed risk/reward,” Barclays analysts led by Carter Gould warned ahead of the April data.

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A list of the most promising medical treatments for COVID-19

A list of the most promising medical treatments for COVID-19

over one hundred drugs are being tested or researched for COVID-19 treatment.
over one hundred drugs are being tested or researched for COVID-19 treatment.

P. Ravikumar/Reuters

A novel coronavirus has infected more than 1.2 million people worldwide and killed more than 70,000. 

There is no medical treatment that cures patients with COVID-19. However, some of the world’s leading drugmakers are testing hundreds of existing drugs and investigating new ones to produce a treatment for those already infected.

Here’s our list of some of the most promising medical treatments undergoing clinical trial testing right now.

Remdesivir: The California biotech Gilead is repurposing a drug called remdesivir that was previously tested against Ebola.

There are five clinical trials testing remdesivir on COVID-19 patients.
There are five clinical trials testing remdesivir on COVID-19 patients.

The WHO has called the antiviral remdesivir “the most promising candidate” for treatment against COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

Company executives and health officials have stressed the need to wait for clinical results. Those findings will come quickly though,

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When will Covid-19 peak in the US?

When will Covid-19 peak in the US?

AFP via Getty Images
AFP via Getty Images

The peak of the coronavirus pandemic in the US is only 10 days away, with 3,130 Americans predicted to die in one day, new data show.

Statistics provided by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) estimate the total number of deaths within the US due to the novel coronavirus to reach 81,766 by 4 August.

However, the projections find that the need for hospital beds, ICU beds, and ventilators needed to deal with the Covid-19 epidemic are less than previously estimated, according to a press release.

IHME statistics suggest that around 25,000 ventilators, 140,000 beds, and 29,000 ICU beds will be needed for hospitals to cope with the pandemic.

Hospitals are predicted to reach their resource limits on the 15 April, one day before the height of the death toll is reached.

Dr Christopher Murray, Director of IHME at the University of Washington’s School

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Is Diarrhea a Sign of the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19?

Is Diarrhea a Sign of the novel coronavirus disease, COVID-19?

The novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is a slippery customer. The trio of characteristic symptoms is supposed to be cough, fever, and trouble breathing. But clinicians are learning that in a subset of patients with COVID-19, gastrointestinal issues can be the first—and sometimes only—symptom. (In another subset, loss of smell and taste is.)

As early as January, patients in China were showing up at clinics with diarrhea and testing positive for COVID-19. One epidemiological study of 206 patients in China found that 48 of them had no other symptoms but gut issues. In that study, patients with digestive symptoms had a “low severity of disease,” the authors say, but they took longer to clear the virus, especially from the stool.

True to its reputation for unpredictability, in another study—also chronicling patients in China—COVID-19 with gut symptoms was linked to worse findings. These researchers concluded that patients with digestive symptoms showed

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COVID-19 scams on computers, smartphones

COVID-19 scams on computers, smartphones

Cybercriminals are looking to profit from pandemic fears – using concerns about a human-transmitted virus to spread computer viruses, if you will – with a fresh crop of malicious software and scams.

One of the first attacks in mid-March arrived in the form of an email message from what appeared to be the World Health Organization, suggesting you read an attachment with official information on how to protect yourself from the coronavirus.

Clicking the file from this impersonator, however, downloaded a hidden installer to your computer that let cybercriminals have access to your data lifted from your keystrokes. The email phishing campaign is one of several coronavirus-related scams detailed recently by security firm Malwarebytes.

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One of the first scams tied to coronavirus were phony World Health Organization messages -- and they’re still circulating, warns the Federal Trade Commission.
One of the first scams tied to coronavirus were phony World
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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Experts urge smokers and tobacco firms to quit for COVID-19

LONDON, April 6 (Reuters) – Health experts on Monday urged smokers to quit and cigarette companies to stop producing and selling tobacco products to help reduce the risks from COVID-19.

“The best thing the tobacco industry can do to fight COVID-19 is to immediately stop producing, marketing and selling tobacco,” Gan Quan, a public health specialist and a director at the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, said in a statement.

The group, which links international respiratory and lung specialists, officials and health agencies, said it is “deeply concerned” about COVID-19’s impact on the world’s 1.3 billion smokers, in particular those in poorer countries whose health systems are already overburdened.

Smoking is known to weaken the immune system, making it less able to respond effectively to infections. Smokers may also already have lung disease or reduced lung capacity which would greatly increase the risk of serious illness.

Quan said

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Puerto Rico discovers protective supply cache amid COVID-19

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — The suspected mismanagement of essential supplies during Hurricane Maria turned out to be a boon for Puerto Rico as it fights a rise in coronavirus cases.

Health Secretary Lorenzo González said Saturday that officials discovered a cache of urgently needed personal protective equipment at a hospital in the nearby island of Vieques that remains closed since the Category 4 storm hit the U.S. territory in September 2017.

He said the equipment includes face masks, gloves, gowns and face shields that were in good condition and would be distributed to health institutions.

“They’re very useful at this moment,” said González, who became the island’s newest health secretary this week, the third in the span of two weeks.

He also said officials recently located a warehouse with medicine and medical equipment worth $4 million donated during Hurricane Maria, and that nearly all of it had expired.

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