Tag: crisis

Front-line doctors face a mental health crisis amid coronavirus. Can medicine overcome the culture of stoicism?

Front-line doctors face a mental health crisis amid coronavirus. Can medicine overcome the culture of stoicism?

The coronavirus pandemic has taken a toll on the American psyche, with a third of Americans now showing signs of clinical depression or anxiety, a rate twice as high as before the pandemic, according to Census Bureau data. Those grim statistics are likely even more dire for the health care workers on the front lines of the crisis, experts say.

While it’s too early to truly quantify the effect that treating patients under combat-like conditions will have on doctors in the coming months or years, preliminary research out of China highlights the mental health risk that American health care workers potentially face.

Of more than 1,200 health care workers surveyed in China, roughly half showed symptoms of depression or anxiety, according to a JAMA Network Open article published in March. More than a third of those surveyed reported insomnia. Some 70% said they were distressed. Nurses, women, health workers who … Read More

Climate Change Is A Health Crisis, And Doctors Aren't Prepared

Climate Change Is A Health Crisis, And Doctors Aren’t Prepared

Illustration: Josh Cochran for HuffPost

This story about climate change and education was produced as part of the nine-part series “Are We Ready? How Schools Are Preparing — and Not Preparing — Children for Climate Change,” reported by HuffPost and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

On a gray, drizzly January afternoon, more than 80 students gathered inside Room M106 at Stanford School of Medicine for a lecture on how the changing climate affects children’s health.

Stanford physician-scientist Kari Nadeau, who focuses on allergies and asthma, discussed young patients she’s treated whose symptoms may be linked to climate stresses. She talked about a 12-year-old whose depression, insulin resistance and asthma seemed to be getting worse as a result of air pollution and extreme heat. She challenged the student audience to come up with possible diagnoses and asked, “What can we do

Read More
Mom delivers four babies during coronavirus crisis

Mom delivers four babies during coronavirus crisis

When Jenny Marr went to her first ultrasound exam to get a peek at her first child with husband Chris Marr, she noticed a strange look had crossed her doctor’s face. Naturally, she worried that something was wrong with the baby. She asked Dr. Lauren Murray if there was a problem.

“I was like, ‘Oh no, there’s no heartbeat.’ And, she’s like, ‘No, there is a heartbeat,’” Marr, 35, of Dallas, recalled to TODAY. “She goes, ‘Y’all, there’s three babies in there.’ And we were just absolutely floored.”

Feeding quadruplets every three hours it tough. It takes about an hour for them all to eat, then there’s only a short window of time before they start it again. Still, the Marrs feel like they’re getting the hang of it. Courtesy Marr family

Both Marr and Chris, 35, are only children and as far as they know no one in their

Read More
Vote for the amazing people who have gone the extra mile during the coronavirus crisis

Vote for the amazing people who have gone the extra mile during the coronavirus crisis

Last month, we invited you to share with us the stories of your lockdown heroes: the neighbours who had gone the extra mile to keep local spirits up, the small businesses pivoting to better serve their towns and villages, the community projects aiming to put a smile (or in some cases, PPE) on the faces of those in need. 

And you have responded in your droves. We received over 1,500 nominations across our 11 categories, and heard some truly inspirational, moving and uplifting tales. 

In our Best Neighbour category you told us about the 57-year-old retiree who had become his village’s oldest paperboy, helping to keep elderly local residents supplied with their daily newspapers; and the 15-year-old gymnast who has become her street’s resident fitness coach.

Lauren Ezekiel – Rii Schroer

In our Crafty Creations category, you nominated an artist who has donated works to care homes and hospices,

Read More
how banks, builders, Pearson, GSK and AstraZeneca have innovated to survive the covid crisis

how banks, builders, Pearson, GSK and AstraZeneca have innovated to survive the covid crisis

It’s easy amid the economic doom and gloom to lose sight of the innovative ways businesses have found to cope with the lockdown and all its difficulties.

Banks, law firms and accountants have decamped to home working in ways nobody would have thought possible eight weeks ago. From spare rooms and attic offices, armies of skilled advisers have raised billions of pounds of rescue funds for clients, saving a generation of jobs.

Pearson’s digital learning team has helped the world’s schools and universities switch relatively painlessly to home learning.

Construction firms unable to open show homes have kept sales going by using virtual showrooms online. Not to mention totally changing building sites to maintain social distancing.

The crisis has forced businesses, through trial and error, to innovate, change and probably improve the way they operate forever.

For drug companies, experimentation has always been bread and butter. It has stood us

Read More
India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

10 Ways to Survive the Mental Health Crisis as a Health Care Worker

On a recent Friday afternoon, while much of the Mount Sinai Health System staff was focusing on patients with COVID-19, the illness caused by the coronavirus, Dr. Dennis Charney was thinking about the mental health crisis threatening his colleagues. “Mount Sinai has been the epicenter of the epicenter. We know what the experience is like dealing with the this terrible virus and death and we’re hearing lots of stories of stress from our staff. We predict that the rate of post traumatic stress disorder could be very high, up to 25%,” says Charney, a psychiatrist and dean of Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine.

Similar concerns are gripping hospitals around the country and the world.

[Read: Unsung Heroes Fight the COVID-19 Pandemic.]

What They’re Facing

Even though health care workers are trained to perform under stress, nothing has prepared them for the waves of people with COVID-19. “Imagine working

Read More
What can Greek mythology teach us about the Covid crisis?

What can Greek mythology teach us about the Covid crisis?

If the world wasn’t all topsy-turvy right now I’d probably be out shopping for shorts and flip-flops. In a few weeks I was supposed to be jetting off to Greece for the summer holiday of my dreams: a cultural retreat focusing on the highlights of the ancient world. It was meant to be three days in Athens, taking in the Parthenon, the Pnyx hill, even assisting an archaeological dig, with lectures in mythology and ancient literature in the evenings, then a dash across the Aegean to the island of Antiparos for four days of feta, olives, and exploring ruins. 

Alas, instead it looks like my summer holiday will be spent in bed, gazing out of the window, and reading Madeline Miller’s novels.  

However, once it became clear that the retreat wouldn’t be going ahead in its original form, Travelgems, the luxury retreat company I’d booked with, swung into action. Refunds

Read More
‘Crisis reveals character.’ Pastor leads a Sacramento church with a coronavirus cluster

‘Crisis reveals character.’ Pastor leads a Sacramento church with a coronavirus cluster

Pastor Jeff Chapman first began to pay attention to coronavirus in late February, when one of his parishioners approached him with requests for changes in how Faith Presbyterian Church operates.

“She’s someone who’s had an organ transplant, and so she was particularly concerned about being susceptible,” Chapman said. “She wanted us to make some changes in worship and to socially distance.

“I didn’t know that term at the time. She wanted no shaking hands, no passing plates, things like that. To be honest, I was a little resistant.”

But the woman was persistent, and Chapman agreed to make the changes in time for Sunday services on March 1.

THE LOST SPRINGA series on the ways coronavirus has changed lives in Sacramento. View all stories

The church stopped passing the offering plates. Communion, which typically used a shared loaf of bread and shared cup, was switched to individual offerings. The

Read More
England players among footballers using mental health services during coronavirus crisis

England players among footballers using mental health services during coronavirus crisis

The Football Association has provided mental health support for England players amid a surge in depression and anxiety among female players during the coronavirus crisis.

Telegraph Sport understands that meetings have also been held with clubs, to discuss players’ mental wellbeing.  Additionally, from next season, regulations will insist that Women’s Super League clubs must demonstrate that they have a mental health and wellbeing strategy, including a referral pathway and clinical psychological support. 

The news comes after a survey by the global players’ union, Fifpro, found that the number of female footballers reporting symptoms of depression has doubled since the sport shut down. A study by the organisation in December and January — when football was still active in most locations globally — indicated that 11 per cent of women players reported symptoms characteristic of depression, a number that has since risen to 22 per cent. Eighteen per cent of the

Read More
Half a century ago stoic Britons battle a similar health crisis without any lockdown

Half a century ago stoic Britons battle a similar health crisis without any lockdown

Coronavirus Article Bar with counter ..

As the Apollo 8 spacecraft passed the halfway mark to the moon, commander Colonel Frank Borman and his companions reported they were feeling unwell. On hearing their symptoms, one official in ground control remarked: “I’m not a doctor, but it sounds like Asian flu.”

Debate raged in Houston about what to do, amid fears that the astronauts had caught the H3N2 strain of influenza after meeting with President Lyndon Johnson – who had spent his final weeks at the White House fighting this disease – just before their mission.

It was soon decided that they likely had little more than nausea, and so were free to become the first crew to fly to the Moon, orbit it and return. If they suffered any worse in their December 1968 flight, drastic action would have been necessary.

The pandemic had been raging since July, when

Read More