Tag: expert

Should we wear masks or not? An expert sorts through the confusion

Should we wear masks or not? An expert sorts through the confusion

<span class="caption">The guidance on masks appears to be shifting, but social distancing is still the key step people can take.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/corona-virus-covid19-close-young-asian-1684027927" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Muhammad Fayyaz Rub/Shutterstock.com">Muhammad Fayyaz Rub/Shutterstock.com</a></span>
The guidance on masks appears to be shifting, but social distancing is still the key step people can take. Muhammad Fayyaz Rub/Shutterstock.com

As a professor at Boston University’s School of Medicine and a geriatrician at Boston Medical Center caring for the most vulnerable in this pandemic, I’ve been asked a lot of questions about COVID-19.

It turns out there is good science out there that helps us know what masks we need to wear and when to wear them. That being said, some of the following advice could change as scientists learn more about why some people get a bad or even lethal case of this virus while many more get through it OK. One of the areas of greatest confusion seems to be about masks.

Much of the decision about wearing masks depends on what the essential businesses that remain open are doing to ensure social distancing and therefore,

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Dr. John F. Murray at his apartment in Paris, where he lived in recent years. <span class="copyright">(Murray family)</span>

Leading lung expert John F. Murray dies of coronavirus-related complications at 92

Dr. John F. Murray at his apartment in Paris, where he lived in recent years. <span class="copyright">(Murray family)</span>
Dr. John F. Murray at his apartment in Paris, where he lived in recent years. (Murray family)

John F. Murray, a leading figure in the field of pulmonary medicine and an expert on lung disease, has died of coronavirus-related complication at a hospital in Paris.

Murray, who led the Pulmonary and Critical Care Division at UC San Francisco for 23 years, died Tuesday after being diagnosed with the disease on March 18, said Douglas Murray, his son. He was 92.

As a researcher, professor and physician, Murray dedicated his career to pulmonary medicine and helped establish the study of the lung and lung diseases as a distinct field, separate from cardiology. He co-authored “Murray and Nadel’s Textbook of Respiratory Medicine,” now in its 6th edition, edited the American Review of Respiratory Disease, and helped develop the standards for training pulmonary doctors.

Murray and a team of researchers also developed

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Medical staff shows packets of a Nivaquine, tablets containing chloroquine and Plaqueril, tablets containing hydroxychloroquine, drugs that have shown signs of effectiveness against coronavirus. (Photo by GERARD JULIEN/AFP via Getty Images)

Malaria expert warns White House to avoid touting benefits of chloroquine for coronavirus

With more than 50,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus in the U.S. and climbing, Americans are eager for a treatment to stop its spread. In recent days, attention has been fixated on two drugs that may have the potential to be beneficial for patients with COVID-19: an anti-malaria drug known as chloroquine (or hydroxychloroquine) and an anti-bacterial drug called azithromycin.

But in the wake of news that an Arizona man died after consuming chloroquine phosphate, an aquarium cleaner that he believed was the chloroquine being touted by the White House, many are expressing concerns that endorsements of the medicine are coming too soon. Christopher Plowe, a professor of global health at Duke University and a world-renowned expert on malaria drugs, is one of them.

“People with the public platform that the White House has need to be aware that everything they say is going to be very influential to people,”

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Cameron Shaver and Callie Johnson practice social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as they enjoy dinner at City Dock in Annapolis, U.S., March 18, 2020. (Photo: REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert)

Public health expert urges people to trust social distancing amid coronavirus outbreak

While Trump administration is reportedly becoming impatient with blanket social distancing measures, public health officials are urging people to continue practice social distancing.

“Anything we put in place about a week ago, anything we’re seeing that’s beneficial is from two weeks ago,” Yale University’s Dr. Howard Forman, a public health professor, told Yahoo Finance’s On The Move. “We have to be patient. We have to wait this out. It’s a very frustrating and stressful time for a lot of people. You have to recognize that the effort that you’re doing right now are enormous investments in some level of stability or at least starting to plateau for two weeks from now.” 

Cameron Shaver and Callie Johnson practice social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as they enjoy dinner at City Dock in Annapolis, U.S., March 18, 2020. (Photo: REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert)

Social distancing is defined as

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Donald Trump clashes with top medical expert on virus drug

Donald Trump clashes with top medical expert on virus drug

President Donald Trump and the US government’s top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci publicly sparred on Friday over whether a malaria drug would work to treat people with the coronavirus.

The extraordinary scene played out on national television during the daily White House briefing on the outbreak, in which Americans heard conflicting answers from a just-the-facts scientist and a president who operates on gut instinct.

Reporters asked both men — first Dr Fauci then Mr Trump — if a malaria drug called hydroxychloroquine could be used to prevent Covid-19, the disease caused by the virus.

On Thursday, when Dr Fauci was not present, Mr Trump had called attention to the drug. On Friday, Dr Fauci took the reporter’s question and got right to the point.

“No,” he said. “The answer … is no.

“The information that you’re referring to specifically is anecdotal,” Dr Fauci added firmly. “It was not

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