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Prince Charles' coronavirus diagnosis is a huge deal for Brits, the monarchy. Here's why.

Prince Charles’ coronavirus diagnosis is a huge deal for Brits, the monarchy. Here’s why.

The coronavirus threat was made alarmingly vivid Wednesday to millions of people in the United Kingdom with the news that Prince Charles has contracted the virus, albeit in mild form.

Already reeling from anxiety and uncertainty, this announcement from Clarence House suddenly brought home to the British the stakes for the future as COVID-19 continues its seemingly inexorable march around the globe.

Americans might wonder: Why is this such a big deal? However imperfect the analogy, they should think of this in the same way they would greet news that the vice president of the United States had tested positive.

The Prince of Wales, 71, is Britain’s future head of state as King Charles III. He is first in line after his mother, Queen Elizabeth II, who turns 94 next month. If something were to happen to both of them, his elder son, Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, 37, would

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The US is running short on ventilators amid the coronavirus pandemic. Here's how they work and why they're so important.

The US is running short on ventilators amid the coronavirus pandemic. Here’s how they work and why they’re so important.

A nasal ventilator is pictured as a patient suffering from COVID-19 is treated in a pulmonology hospital in Vannes, France, March 20, 2020.
A nasal ventilator is pictured as a patient suffering from COVID-19 is treated in a pulmonology hospital in Vannes, France, March 20, 2020.

Reuters/Stephane Mahe

  • Ventilators are in short supply in the US. 

  • Reported symptoms of patients with coronavirus include difficulty breathing.

  • Ventilators, which blow air into patients’ lungs to assist the natural process of breathing, could be the difference between life and death for some.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The US does not have enough ventilators, the medical machines that could be the difference between life and death for COVID-19 virus patients struggling to breathe. 

A February report from the Center for Health Security at Johns Hopkins revealed the US has about 160,000 ventilators ready for use in hospitals, with another 8,900 held in a national reserve. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has warned repeatedly that his state, the epicenter of coronavirus in the US, is

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Here’s how your life will (and won’t) change under coronavirus stay-at-home order

Here’s how your life will (and won’t) change under coronavirus stay-at-home order

On Thursday at 6 p.m., Durham starts a new life under stay-at-home restrictions, with Orange County joining on Friday and Wake County expected to quickly follow.

So what does this mean? Can I still get groceries, go jogging, buy a book, change my oil? Yes, yes, yes and yes. But it’s complicated. Here is a breakdown of how Durham Mayor Steve Schewel’s Wednesday announcement will change your routine. In other parts of the Triangle, the rules are the same.

Food. Grocery sales are considered essential business and all stores that sell them can remain open, though social-distancing space is urged while shopping. Schewel exempted any store selling “critical products,” which would include convenience stores and mom-and-pops.

Medicine. Pharmacies can stay open and prescriptions can be picked up. Doctors’ office visits are all OK, though many have already advised “telemedicine” rather than office visits for non-emergencies. Schewel

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President Trump Called Hydroxychloroquine a 'Game Changer,' But Experts Warn Against Self-Medicating With the Drug. Here’s What You Need to Know

President Trump Called Hydroxychloroquine a ‘Game Changer,’ But Experts Warn Against Self-Medicating With the Drug. Here’s What You Need to Know

After President Trump, late last week, expressed great confidence in the promise of a new COVID-19 therapy that combines two existing prescription medications, supplies of these two drugs rapidly began disappearing from pharmacy shelves. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration allowed an Indian company previously restricted from importing drug products into the US to now start manufacturing one of the drugs. And U.S. plants began gearing up to produce enough to meet the surge in demand.

But in those few days, a few people who began self medicating with the drugs in an effort to prevent COVID-19 have died, and others have been hospitalized. These tragedies have raised questions about the safety of the drug combo, and how valid they are as a possible solution to treating COVID-19.

The combination Trump mentioned includes two drugs: azithromycin and hydroxychloroquine. Azithromycin is an antibiotic, usually prescribed for a range of bacterial infections,

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A pregnant woman wears a face mask as a preventative measure against the spread of the new coronavirus, COVID-19, as she waits for the bus in Bogota, on March 16, 2020.

Can Coronavirus Affect Pregnancy or Newborns? Here’s What the Experts Say

More than 130 million women give birth around the world each year. During pregnancy, changes in the immune system make women generally more susceptible to respiratory infections. And this year, pregnant women also have to worry about COVID-19, a virus that can affect a person’s lungs and airways.

The U.K. government announced on Monday that pregnant women were at an increased risk of severe illness from coronavirus (COVID-19). Speaking at a press conference, Public Health England chief medical officer Chris Whitty said people in the “high risk” category should stay at home for 12 weeks. (That includes people over 70, people with underlying health conditions and pregnant women.) Whitty described the advice to pregnant women as “a precautionary measure” because “we are early in our understanding of this virus and we want to be sure.”

However, this doesn’t square with guidance issued by other public health officials. During a press

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coronavirus hair (Getty Images stock)

Can coronavirus live on hair? Here’s what experts want you to know

As coronavirus continues to spread across the U.S., researchers and experts are finding out more information about how long the virus can survive on certain surfaces.

The CDC estimated that the virus could be viable for “hours to days” depending on the surface and conditions. When it comes to stainless steel and plastic, for example, coronavirus can live on the surface for two or three days, according to research shared by the National Institute of Health.

One seemingly untested surface is hair. Dr. Saad Omer, director of the Yale Institute for Global Health, said that he doesn’t “recall anyone” testing hair amid the coronavirus outbreak, but said that the virus likely wouldn’t live on hair as long as other surfaces.

“Usually, viruses survive for lesser durations on porous surfaces, such as hair, than smooth surfaces, such as stainless steel,” he said.

Dr. Adam Friedman, the interim chair of dermatology at

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