Tag: lines

LGBTQ health workers on the front lines as Supreme Court weighs job protections

LGBTQ health workers on the front lines as Supreme Court weighs job protections

For the past two months, physician assistant Mia McDonald and Dr. Ly Pham – one in North Carolina, the other in Louisiana – have been steady warriors in a battle with a beast that has ravaged this nation.

Their spirits have sagged with defeat, been buoyed by hope. There have been moments of calm, hours of exhaustion.

But an uneasy reality haunts these LGBTQ health care workers on the front lines in the coronavirus pandemic: They are employed in states where they could be fired for their sexual orientation and gender identity.

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule soon in a trio of landmark cases that could guarantee federal protections to LGBTQ workers such as McDonald and Pham. The timing couldn’t be more urgent, advocates say. 

“Like all health care providers, LGBTQ people are standing up to personal and professional challenges in this pandemic. They are risking their

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Doctors on front lines in Navajo Nation

Doctors on front lines in Navajo Nation

REVERB is a new documentary series from CBSN Originals. Watch the latest episode, “Coronavirus in Navajo Nation,” in the video player above.

Navajo Nation is one of the hardest-hit regions per capita for coronavirus in the U.S. Despite its relatively low population density, this area has a higher coronavirus death rate than that of 46 states. CBS News spoke with Navajo Nation health care workers on the front lines. Here are three of their stories, in their own words. 

Dr. Sophina Calderon

Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation, Tuba City

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Dr. Sophina Calderon grew up in Navajo Nation and practices family medicine at Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation. CBS News

Dr. Calderon grew up outside of Tuba City in the Navajo Nation. She is a family medicine practitioner and the deputy chief of staff at Tuba City Regional Health Care Corporation. She is currently seeing patients in the

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Moms on the front lines of COVID-19

Moms on the front lines of COVID-19

One physician and mom has her 9-month-old living with family out-of-state. Another doctor hadn’t seen her son in 6 weeks, as she was gowning up to save lives during the pandemic.

Dr. Audrey Cruz of Loma Linda, California, has been separated from her 9-month-old baby while working on the same floor as patients with COVID-19 — the virus that’s killed more than 70,000 Americans and hundreds of thousands worldwide.

“Being a COVID hospitalist means I’m putting myself at risk,” Cruz, an internal medicine attending physician, told “Good Morning America.” “Even though I’m not working directly with COVID patients, I’m working on the same floor, with nurses who care for them, doctors who care for them..I wanted to make sure my son was as safe as possible.”

Cruz’s son is currently living with her parents, three hours away from her, in Las Vegas, Nevada. The last time she saw him in … Read More

She's a doctor on the front lines of the coronavirus. At home, she has no running water.

She’s a doctor on the front lines of the coronavirus. At home, she has no running water.

Every third day, someone from Dr. Michelle Tom’s family navigates their pickup truck 14 miles over the pothole-pocked dirt roads of the Navajo Nation to a community center. There, for about $95 a week, her family fills their water tank and hauls it back home to the double-wide trailer she shares with seven relatives in northeastern Arizona.

Or at least that’s how Tom was getting water before she had to cut off physical contact with her family because of the coronavirus pandemic that has raged across tribal communities. For now, she is living with a co-worker to maintain her distance and prevent spread.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

“I haven’t hugged anyone in weeks,” said Tom, who spends her days treating COVID-19 patients at the Winslow Indian Health Care Center urgent care facility in Winslow, Arizona, as well as on the Navajo reservation.

IMAGE: Dr. Michelle Tom (Courtesy Dr. Michelle Tom)
IMAGE: Dr. Michelle Tom (Courtesy Dr.
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Young Medical Graduates Find Themselves on the Front Lines of Italy's Coronavirus Fight

Young Medical Graduates Find Themselves on the Front Lines of Italy’s Coronavirus Fight

On the morning of March 8, Francesca Tamburelli was in her apartment in Heidelberg, Germany, when she learned that part of Italy was entering lockdown due to the spread of the novel coronavirus. Upon hearing the news the 25-year-old, who graduated from medical school just last summer, quickly boarded a bus to her hometown of Turin. Within a few days, she was working in a hospital in Cremona, a city in the epicenter of Italy’s outbreak, where nearly 500 patients suffering from COVID-19 are treated. Other than internships and volunteer work in Tanzania, it’s her first professional experience in a hospital.

Tamburelli is one of the many young doctors in Italy responding to the calls recently put out by local administrations to meet the shortage of medical staff in hospitals experiencing unprecedented levels of pressure. Italy is one of the worst affected countries by the coronavirus; over 86,000 people here

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Sanitation workers on coronavirus front lines seek respect

Sanitation workers on coronavirus front lines seek respect

When Fasika Getahun, 48, finishes her shift as a custodian at Harborview Medical Center in Seattle each day, she goes home exhausted but excited to see her seven kids. She’s a single mom who immigrated from East Africa, and it’s gratifying to come home to see them healthy and happy.

But since the coronavirus outbreak has pummeled Washington and her adopted city, the anxiety of working on the front lines in a hospital — where she thoroughly disinfects bathrooms and infected patient areas without personal protective equipment — has begun to wear on her.

Returning home now doesn’t bring the same comfort it once did.

Getahun said she and the 50 other members of the cleaning staff are asked to constantly work without masks or any protective gear, and their team meetings each morning begin in a small room where they are packed together tightly.

“I am worried. I have

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Life as a Health Care Worker on the Coronavirus Pandemic Front Lines

The coronavirus pandemic is upending health care as usual. Basic infection-prevention items are scarce. Hospital hallways are cleared of visitors. Waiting rooms in doctor’s offices and dental practices are eerily empty. Medical teams are thinning as some members go out on self-quarantine. Unease looms with the possibility that lifesaving equipment like ventilators won’t be available for critically ill patients who need them.

Below, health care workers share their perspectives from the COVID-19 front lines and describe how they’re doing their best to adapt and continue providing safe patient care.

[SEE: Coronavirus Prevention Steps That Do or Do Not Work.]

Nurses Need Masks

Gowns, gloves, face shields, surgical or N95 respirator masks — personal protective equipment (PPE in health care shorthand) is the armor nurses wear during the COVID-19 pandemic.

As nurses examine their patients, check vital signs, draw blood samples, give intravenous medicines, apply fresh dressings and provide hands-on,

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Medical schools are fast tracking students so they can play their part on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic

Medical schools are fast tracking students so they can play their part on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic

A paramedic walks out of a tent that was set up in front of the emergency ward of the Cremona hospital in northern Italy.
A paramedic walks out of a tent that was set up in front of the emergency ward of the Cremona hospital in northern Italy.

Associated Press

  • Medical schools in Ireland moved up their exams so young doctors could help in coronavirus pandemic.

  • About 1,300 students are expected to graduate from the country’s six medical schools, according to the Irish Times.

  • Some of them will be eligible to work by next month. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

While the coronavirus has led to some schools canceling their exams, medical schools in Ireland have moved theirs up so new doctors can take their place on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic, according to the Irish Times.

“People often talk about young people being snowflakes or self-centered,” said Prof. Hannah McGee, dean at Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland told the Times. “Yet, they have taken on early exams, with a

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