Tag: mail

Can You Get Coronavirus From Mail? Experts Explain.

Can You Get Coronavirus From Mail? Experts Explain.

Scientists are still learning a lot about the novel coronavirus—including how long it survives on surfaces. And as more people shop online to avoid crowds, some are wondering whether you can catch COVID-19, the disease caused by coronavirus, from packages and mail.

“It’s a very difficult question to answer,” says microbiologist Rodney Rohde, PhD, associate dean for research for the College of Health Professions at Texas State University.

Studies show the virus can survive on surfaces for several days, but there’s no evidence that it’s transmissible through goods. The novel coronavirus can last up to three days on plastic and 24 hours on cardboard, according to a paper published in the New England Journal of Medicine.

However, lab studies don’t reflect real life conditions, Rohde cautions.

Viruses are fragile, meaning they don’t hold up well on surfaces—especially when exposed to heat and sunlight. A package may have traces of the

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Coronavirus can live on surfaces for days. But it can't travel through the mail, experts say

Coronavirus can live on surfaces for days. But it can’t travel through the mail, experts say

With stores stripped bare of household essentials, retailers cutting back hours and experts calling for social distancing amid the spread of coronavirus, many people may rely on delivery services to get what they need.

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Tuesday found that coronavirus could be detected up to three hours after aerosolization in the air, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel.

This had led some to wonder whether those packages on their front porch could spread coronavirus. The answer seems to be no. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that the virus is spread through respiratory droplets and there is currently no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 with imported goods.

“In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there

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