Tag: medical

Ex-MLB player finishes medical school, primes to fight virus

Ex-MLB player finishes medical school, primes to fight virus

NEW YORK (AP) — If he wanted, Mark Hamilton could show off his World Series ring at work.

But the fill-in first baseman for the 2011 champion St. Louis Cardinals prefers to keep that prize safe at home.

”The surgical scrub tub, not the most conducive place to wear it,” Hamilton said.

On Friday, under an accelerated schedule prompted by dire circumstances, the former big leaguer is set to graduate a month early from medical school on Long Island.

Next stop for the rookie doc, the first-hand fight against the coronavirus pandemic in one of the world’s hardest-hit areas.

”I could get the call tomorrow, that it’s time to go in,” Hamilton said this week. ”I have had an incredible journey to becoming a doctor over the last four years, and not once did I think that I would find myself entering the field in a time like this.”

”Over

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A list of the most promising medical treatments for COVID-19

A list of the most promising medical treatments for COVID-19

over one hundred drugs are being tested or researched for COVID-19 treatment.
over one hundred drugs are being tested or researched for COVID-19 treatment.

P. Ravikumar/Reuters

A novel coronavirus has infected more than 1.2 million people worldwide and killed more than 70,000. 

There is no medical treatment that cures patients with COVID-19. However, some of the world’s leading drugmakers are testing hundreds of existing drugs and investigating new ones to produce a treatment for those already infected.

Here’s our list of some of the most promising medical treatments undergoing clinical trial testing right now.

Remdesivir: The California biotech Gilead is repurposing a drug called remdesivir that was previously tested against Ebola.

There are five clinical trials testing remdesivir on COVID-19 patients.
There are five clinical trials testing remdesivir on COVID-19 patients.

The WHO has called the antiviral remdesivir “the most promising candidate” for treatment against COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus.

Company executives and health officials have stressed the need to wait for clinical results. Those findings will come quickly though,

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Hilton, American Express offer free hotel rooms to medical workers

Hilton, American Express offer free hotel rooms to medical workers

  • Today, Hilton and American Express announced that they will offer hotel rooms free of charge for up to 1 million workers represented by 10 medical associations across the United States.
  • Hilton and American Express will cover stays beginning April 13 through May 31, according to a Hilton press release.
  • The hotels will be staffed by Hilton team members, who will be trained on health and safety measures, the release said.
  • Hotels are seeing unprecedented declines in occupancy and healthcare agencies are rushing to find resources and beds for medical workers and patients as the coronavirus spreads across the US. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Hilton and American Express have joined together to offer hotel rooms free of charge to as many as one million medical workers working on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic beginning next week.

The companies are initially partnering with 10 medical associations, which

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Doctors and nurses rate 10 popular medical shows based on accuracy

Doctors and nurses rate 10 popular medical shows based on accuracy

Medical experts had a lot of things to say about popular TV shows.
Medical experts had a lot of things to say about popular TV shows.

ABC/FOX

Although doctor-centric dramas can be entertaining, they’re usually filled with a number of inaccurate portrayals of the medical field.

To see where which popular shows get the details right and which ones are loaded with problems, Insider consulted with real doctors and nurses.

Here’s how the experts really feel about popular medical shows. 

Note: The Entertainment Value and Medical Accuracy scores on each slide are the averages of the scores (out of 10) that the experts provided for each show. 

Medical professionals panned “Grey’s Anatomy” as being extremely inaccurate, though entertaining.

The experts especially didn't think the portrayal of interns was accurate.
The experts especially didn’t think the portrayal of interns was accurate.

Eric McCandless/ABC

Medical Accuracy: 4/10

Entertainment Value: 8/10

Since first airing in 2005, ABC’s medical drama “Grey’s Anatomy” has developed a devoted fan following.

However, doctors found the many romantic liaisons and adrenaline-soaked atmosphere

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Month-By-Month Guide to the Medical School Admissions Cycle

Like the undergraduate admissions cycle, the process of getting into medical school stretches over many months and involves keeping track of test scores, transcripts, letters of recommendation, additional school-specific material and more.

Before you open any medical school application, it is worth your time to educate yourself on what to expect over the course of your application year. Since the process is complex, here’s a month-by-month breakdown so that you know what is coming your way and when.

May

Both the American Medical College Application Service, also known as AMCAS, and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service, also known as AACOMAS, open in May 2020 for medical school admission in fall 2021.

AMCAS is for those wishing to pursue an M.D. and AACOMAS is for those who hope to pursue a D.O. degree. This year, AMCAS opens on May 4 but submissions can’t be made until

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a medical ethicist on how hospitals make difficult decisions

a medical ethicist on how hospitals make difficult decisions

All healthcare resources are limited – staff, equipment, drugs, space and time can all run out. And these resources become even scarcer in cases of unprecedented demand, such as with COVID-19.

Decisions about the use and allocation of scarce resources are regularly made in medicine. These include the allocation of donor organs for transplant, A&E triage and surgery waiting lists. These usually proceed on the basis of those with the greatest medical need being given priority.

But the way these allocation decisions are made in crisis situations differs. This is because medical need is no longer adequate as a basis by itself – as there are more people in urgent need than resources available to help them.

Access to ventilators, for example, is likely to be one of the most challenging resources to allocate – this may mean patients dying without ventilation.

The ethical dilemma

Decisions on how to allocate

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Lizzo buys lunch for medical workers at multiple US hospitals

Lizzo buys lunch for medical workers at multiple US hospitals

Lizzo has bought lunches for medical staff on the frontline of the coronavirus outbreak.

On Monday, the University of Washington hospital in Seattle thanked the “Juice” singer for providing food for its healthcare workers.

“Thank you @Lizzo for sending lunches to the UW Medical Center – Montlake Emergency Department today!” the hospital tweeted.

“Your support of our frontline healthcare workers means a lot. #WeGotThisSeattle.”

The musician sent meals to a number of hospitals across the US, including ones in Minnesota and Louisiana.

“She sent several hospitals food that were hit really hard for staff working around the clock,” her publicist told The Seattle Times.

“She is planning to send food to more hospitals as well.”

Lizzo posted a short video on her Instagram featuring clips and photographs of hospital workers with the meals she sent.

Hospitals to have received food from the singer include University Medical Center in Nashville

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Young Medical Graduates Find Themselves on the Front Lines of Italy's Coronavirus Fight

Young Medical Graduates Find Themselves on the Front Lines of Italy’s Coronavirus Fight

On the morning of March 8, Francesca Tamburelli was in her apartment in Heidelberg, Germany, when she learned that part of Italy was entering lockdown due to the spread of the novel coronavirus. Upon hearing the news the 25-year-old, who graduated from medical school just last summer, quickly boarded a bus to her hometown of Turin. Within a few days, she was working in a hospital in Cremona, a city in the epicenter of Italy’s outbreak, where nearly 500 patients suffering from COVID-19 are treated. Other than internships and volunteer work in Tanzania, it’s her first professional experience in a hospital.

Tamburelli is one of the many young doctors in Italy responding to the calls recently put out by local administrations to meet the shortage of medical staff in hospitals experiencing unprecedented levels of pressure. Italy is one of the worst affected countries by the coronavirus; over 86,000 people here

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Military Medical School to Graduate Students Early, Rush to COVID-19 Response

Military Medical School to Graduate Students Early, Rush to COVID-19 Response

For the first time in its 48-year history, the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences will graduate its fourth-year medical school students and graduate-level nurses early to support the U.S. military’s war on COVID-19.

Roughly 170 medical students and 60 graduate nursing students will depart USUHS in Bethesda, Maryland, between April 1 and April 17, to support the Defense Department’s coronavirus pandemic response.

The medical students, who are not yet licensed because they have not completed the required internships, will work under the supervision of licensed physicians in positions “appropriate within the limits of their duty stations,” such as screening patients and taking health histories, USUHS President Dr. Richard Thomas said in an interview Thursday with Military.com.

The nurses — all of whom have experience and will graduate with advanced degrees — will proceed directly to their assigned duty stations.

“For COVID-19, there’s a lot of extra work for

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Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Leganes

Spain extends coronavirus lockdown, in ‘war’ to buy medical supplies

By Nathan Allen and Inti Landauro

MADRID (Reuters) – Spain extended its coronavirus lockdown on Thursday and said it was fighting a “real war” over medical supplies to contain the world’s second-highest virus death toll, turning to China for many critical products, where officials reported fraud and massive price increases.

A further 655 people died overnight, pushing Spain’s toll from the respiratory disease to 4,089, second only to Italy and further beyond China where the outbreak began.

Elderly nursing home residents have been particularly hard hit. In Madrid, the region worst affected by the virus, authorities pledged to assess each residence and take urgent action as infections and deaths among their vulnerable population mounted.

“Old people have been abandoned in an astonishing way,” said

Carmen Flores, head of patients’ rights group Defensor del Paciente.

In Madrid, Spain’s capital and biggest city, located in the country’s worst-affected region, an ice rink

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