Tag: outbreak

5 Questions Pregnant Women Should Be Asking About Their Birth Plans During the COVID-19 Outbreak

5 Questions Pregnant Women Should Be Asking About Their Birth Plans During the COVID-19 Outbreak

For families who are bringing a new baby into the world any day now, navigating the birth process during the COVID-19 outbreak can be incredibly stressful. With guidelines and recommendations seemingly changing daily as far as social distancing goes, it’s perfectly normal for women to have questions about their birth plan and how the process will go once they’re admitted to the hospital. We spoke with medical experts ranging from ob-gyns to nurse-midwives about what questions women should be asking health professionals about giving birth.

Related: Baby Shark Has a New Song About Washing Hands That Is Sure to Have a 100% Success Rate

1. How is my birth plan going to change amid the COVID-19 outbreak?

The biggest concern for most soon-to-be parents is understandably how their birth plan is going to change. “First and foremost, ask your doctor what – if any – changes in your prenatal care

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not the outbreak itself, but rather the US's lackluster response

not the outbreak itself, but rather the US’s lackluster response

Kaylah Jenkins dons personal protective equipment during infection-control training aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort as the vessel transits the Atlantic Ocean on its way to New York City in support of COVID-19 response efforts.
Kaylah Jenkins dons personal protective equipment during infection-control training aboard the hospital ship USNS Comfort as the vessel transits the Atlantic Ocean on its way to New York City in support of COVID-19 response efforts.

US Navy via Getty Images

  • Three disease experts told Business Insider that they weren’t shocked by the emergence of a contagious new strain of coronavirus. 

  • They said the biggest surprise has been the “lack of coordinated public-health response” in the US, which led to a shortage of tests and an incomplete patchwork of shelter-in-place orders.

  • Officials should have been “thinking about quality controlling test kits, ramping [up] production of tests, thinking about hospital capacity,” one expert said.

  • After downplaying the threat of the coronavirus, President Trump now estimates that it could kill 100,000 to 240,000 people in the US.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The emergence of a novel coronavirus didn’t surprise Meghan

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A coronavirus 'super-spreader' in India who refused to self-isolate sparked an outbreak that left 40,000 people in quarantine, officials say

A coronavirus ‘super-spreader’ in India who refused to self-isolate sparked an outbreak that left 40,000 people in quarantine, officials say

A worker fumigates the interiors of a Karnataka Interstate Transport bus to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus in Bangalore, India, on March 19, 2020.
A worker fumigates the interiors of a Karnataka Interstate Transport bus to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus in Bangalore, India, on March 19, 2020.

Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images

  • A coronavirus “super-spreader” who refused to self-isolate prompted the quarantine of about tens of thousands, officials said.

  • The “super-spreader” did not self-quarantine after traveling to Italy and Germany, and attended a large Sikh festival in India in mid-March.

  • The man died shortly after the festival, and was posthumously diagnosed with the novel coronavirus.

  • His diagnosis prompted officials to lock down 20 neighboring villages in northern India in a bid to contain the spread.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A coronavirus “super-spreader” who refused to self-isolate after traveling prompted the quarantine of about 40,000 people in India, officials said.

Residents from 20 villages in northern India have been quarantined after coming in contact with a 70-year-old man at

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

What’s a pangolin? Scaly mammal may be missing link in coronavirus outbreak, study says

A scaly and endangered mammal could be the missing link in a coronavirus mystery that’s baffling scientists, according to a new study.

Researchers suggest pangolins passed the virus behind the COVID-19 pandemic from bats to humans, the study published this week in the Journal of Proteome Research says.

“Understanding where SARS-CoV-2 – the virus that caused the COVID-19 pandemic ­– came from and how it spreads is important for its control and treatment,” according to an American Chemical Society news release. “Most experts agree that bats are a natural reservoir of (the virus), but an intermediate host was needed for it to jump from bats to humans.”

Some experts remain unsure pangolins transmitted this virus to people.

“In my opinion, none of the data I have seen so far is suggesting that pangolins did serve as an intermediate host,” Kristian G. Andersen, a viral disease expert, told The New York

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How to help the elderly and other vulnerable people during the outbreak

How to help the elderly and other vulnerable people during the outbreak

The government has said the public should now be staying at home and leaving the house only for food, medicine, to travel to work as a key worker or to exercise once a day

In addition other groups of vulnerable people – such as those with underlying health conditions and the over 70s – are also being asked to “socially distance” themselves by staying at home for 12 weeks and having minimal interaction with other people.

Although these measures may be medically necessary, charities have warned that to do so will have an impact in terms of mental health and increased loneliness – particularly for the elderly.

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Other charities that work with vulnerable groups like the homeless, have called on the prime minister to acknowledge the special needs of these groups and give additional help, resources and recourse to funds.

But are there steps that the general population

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Europe sells medicine to Tehran in first bypass of US sanctions, as Iran grapples with coronavirus outbreak

Europe sells medicine to Tehran in first bypass of US sanctions, as Iran grapples with coronavirus outbreak

The United Kingdom, Germany and France announced the first sale of goods to Iran using a bartering mechanism called Instex established to bypass harsh United States sanctions on the country, which is battling a major outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The transaction involves the sale of EUR 500,000 of medicine by a private company in Germany to a firm in Iran, sources with knowledge of the deal told The Independent. The products are unrelated to coronavirus, said a diplomatic source.

“That’s not to say that the mechanism couldn’t be used to help with the pandemic effort in Iran,” said a diplomatic source.

Though unrelated, the sale could help alleviate pressure on a public health system reeling under the impact of an outbreak, which has officially killed nearly 2,900 people in Iran, infected at least 44,000 and at its peak was causing a fatality every 10 minutes.

The deal also

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How much do retirement homes cost?

How courts are handling coronavirus outbreak

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The new coronavirus pandemic has caused most aspects of American life to come to a halt – with states across the country ordering residents to stay inside and keep their distance from others unless absolutely necessary.

As of Thursday afternoon, at least 76,514 COVID-19 cases were reported nationwide, resulting in 1,093 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University and Medicine.

UNEXPECTED ‘ESSENTIAL BUSINESSES’ IDENTIFIED AMID CORONAVIRUS

As officials, regardless of region, continue to grapple with the effects of the pandemic, many have instituted changes in their court system as one way of further curtailing the spread. Here’s how courts in some of the most populated states nationwide have responded:

CALIFORNIA

California was the first state to take the drastic measure of effectively shutting down, asking residents to shelter in place unless they

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Turkey struggles to ramp up tests as outbreak reaches critical phase

Turkey struggles to ramp up tests as outbreak reaches critical phase

By Tuvan Gumrukcu and Can Sezer

ANKARA/ISTANBUL (Reuters) – A week after sending half a million coronavirus test kits to the United States, Turkey is struggling to ramp up its own testing for the disease as doctors warn the country has reached a crossroads in containing the fast-growing outbreak.

Turkey reported its first infection just over two weeks ago.

Since then, a surge in cases to 3,629 has outstripped rates in most other countries and the government has fallen short of its target to conduct 10,000 tests per day.

In interviews with Reuters, experts have urged stronger stay-at-home orders and some said it was risky for Ankara to export 500,000 kits to the United States only to turn around and order a million more from China.

“Our test numbers are low. We were certainly not prepared. Countries that are ready must have high test numbers,” said Sinan Adiyaman, chairman of

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Can I have sex? A guide to intimacy during the coronavirus outbreak

Can I have sex? A guide to intimacy during the coronavirus outbreak

With countries on lockdown and millions being made to stay at home, it’s unsurprising many couples and single people are wondering what coronavirus means for their sex lives. With this in mind, we asked three experts five of the most pressing questions about intimacy during the pandemic.

Is Covid-19 sexually transmissible?

Dr Jessica Justman: We’re not seeing patterns that indicate sexual transmission. It’s primarily spread through respiratory droplets. And touching contaminated surfaces is thought to be the secondary mode of transmission.

Dr Carlos Rodríguez-Díaz: There is no evidence that the Covid-19 can be transmitted via either vaginal or anal intercourse. However, kissing is a very common practice during sexual intercourse, and the virus can be transmitted via saliva. Therefore, the virus can be transmitted by kissing. There is also evidence of oral-fecal transmission of the Covid-19 and that implies that analingus may represent a risk for infection.

So is

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Cameron Shaver and Callie Johnson practice social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as they enjoy dinner at City Dock in Annapolis, U.S., March 18, 2020. (Photo: REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert)

Public health expert urges people to trust social distancing amid coronavirus outbreak

While Trump administration is reportedly becoming impatient with blanket social distancing measures, public health officials are urging people to continue practice social distancing.

“Anything we put in place about a week ago, anything we’re seeing that’s beneficial is from two weeks ago,” Yale University’s Dr. Howard Forman, a public health professor, told Yahoo Finance’s On The Move. “We have to be patient. We have to wait this out. It’s a very frustrating and stressful time for a lot of people. You have to recognize that the effort that you’re doing right now are enormous investments in some level of stability or at least starting to plateau for two weeks from now.” 

Cameron Shaver and Callie Johnson practice social distancing to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as they enjoy dinner at City Dock in Annapolis, U.S., March 18, 2020. (Photo: REUTERS/Mary F. Calvert)

Social distancing is defined as

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