Tag: people

'People have started leaving their houses again'

‘People have started leaving their houses again’

Jen Smith lives in Shenzhen, where it's compulsory to wear a mask outside at all times
Jen Smith lives in Shenzhen, where it’s compulsory to wear a mask outside at all times

My Money is a series looking at how people spend their money – and the sometimes tough decisions they have to make. Here, Jen Smith, a children’s TV presenter from Shenzhen in southern China, takes us through a week in her life, as the country slowly emerges from the coronavirus pandemic.

Over to Jen…

Monday
Monday

Since being in lockdown I’ve been bingeing on Keeping Up With the Kardashians. It starts with one episode after dinner, blink, and suddenly it’s 3am. YouTube, Facebook, Google and Instagram are all banned here, so you’d think I’d be a binge-free socialite after a year and a half living in China. Well, those sites are banned unless you have a VPN – I pay $120 (£97) a year for mine, so Sunday was a late night, with a lie-in

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Can I visit my elderly relatives? And other tips for coronavirus and older people

Can I visit my elderly relatives? And other tips for coronavirus and older people

<span>Photograph: Vladimir Gerdo/TASS</span>
Photograph: Vladimir Gerdo/TASS

People 60 and older are at far higher risk of getting very sick or dying from the coronavirus. And people 85 and over are even more vulnerable, with a death rate from the virus between 10% and 27%, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Related: Have I already had coronavirus? How would I know and what should I do?

Dr Mary Tinetti, chief of geriatrics at Yale school of medicine and Yale New Haven hospital, explains what kinds of precautions they – and the people around them – must take.

Volunteer efforts are popping up to deliver supplies to older and more vulnerable people. Is that risky?

There really isn’t a right answer to your question. It is between a rock and a hard place. Is it better for people to go out in public and get their groceries or to have them

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The new coronavirus might spread when people talk, but scientists say masks can help

The new coronavirus might spread when people talk, but scientists say masks can help

A man wears a mask in a Metro tunnel in downtown Los Angeles. Scientists say it's possible that the new coronavirus can spread through talking or breathing. <span class="copyright">(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)</span>
A man wears a mask in a Metro tunnel in downtown Los Angeles. Scientists say it’s possible that the new coronavirus can spread through talking or breathing. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

It’s possible that the new coronavirus can spread from person to person simply by talking, or even breathing, according to new guidance from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The limited studies examined by a National Academies committee on emerging infectious diseases suggest that people who are infected with the novel virus may exhale infectious “bioaerosols” — although if they do, it’s not clear whether the amount would be enough to make another person sick.

“The results of available studies are consistent with aerosolization of virus from normal breathing,” the head of the committee, Dr. Harvey Fineberg, wrote in a letter to to Kelvin K. Droegemeier, the director of the White House Office of Science

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As virus rages, Berkeley's 'Mother Goose' aids homeless people abandoned by the system

As virus rages, Berkeley’s ‘Mother Goose’ aids homeless people abandoned by the system

Andrea Henson, right, walks with a homeless man who helps her deliver supplies to people living in a homeless encampment along a freeway in Emeryville. <span class="copyright">(Josh Edelson/For the Times)</span>
Andrea Henson, right, walks with a homeless man who helps her deliver supplies to people living in a homeless encampment along a freeway in Emeryville. (Josh Edelson/For the Times)

Roughly 150 or so men and women sleep near the Interstate 80 freeway here, sometimes encountering head-to-toe staph infections or families of rats living inside their mattresses. When that happens, they know who to call.

Andrea Henson’s phone has been ringing for weeks, ever since this bustling university town effectively shut down earlier this month to halt the spread of the coronavirus. With local governments slow to house the homeless, activists such as Henson have stepped into the breach, providing food and other supplies to people sleeping on the street.

“This is the first time I’ve heard people say, ‘Andrea, we’re hungry,’” said Henson, who said that in socially conscious Berkeley, donated food is normally never in short supply.

California had

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

EXPERT VIEWS-Are people living with HIV more at risk from coronavirus?

By Hugo Greenhalgh and Oscar Lopez

LONDON/MEXICO CITY, March 31 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – A s coronavirus sweeps the world, many people living with HIV are asking whether their status counts as an underlying condition and makes them more at risk.

Many HIV-positive people in countries such as Britain and the United States are aged over 50, having contracted the virus during the AIDS pandemic in the 1980-90s, making them more at risk generally to illnesses such as cancer or diabetes.

A 2016 report from public policy research organisation, The Williams Institute at the UCLA School of Law, found HIV-positive LGBT elders had worse overall mental and physical health than their heterosexual peers.

What are the risk factors for people – of all ages – living with HIV in terms of coronavirus?

DR SHANNON HADER, DEPUTY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, PROGRAMME, UNAIDS

“What people first want to know is often related to

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A coronavirus 'super-spreader' in India who refused to self-isolate sparked an outbreak that left 40,000 people in quarantine, officials say

A coronavirus ‘super-spreader’ in India who refused to self-isolate sparked an outbreak that left 40,000 people in quarantine, officials say

A worker fumigates the interiors of a Karnataka Interstate Transport bus to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus in Bangalore, India, on March 19, 2020.
A worker fumigates the interiors of a Karnataka Interstate Transport bus to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 virus in Bangalore, India, on March 19, 2020.

Manjunath Kiran/AFP via Getty Images

  • A coronavirus “super-spreader” who refused to self-isolate prompted the quarantine of about tens of thousands, officials said.

  • The “super-spreader” did not self-quarantine after traveling to Italy and Germany, and attended a large Sikh festival in India in mid-March.

  • The man died shortly after the festival, and was posthumously diagnosed with the novel coronavirus.

  • His diagnosis prompted officials to lock down 20 neighboring villages in northern India in a bid to contain the spread.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A coronavirus “super-spreader” who refused to self-isolate after traveling prompted the quarantine of about 40,000 people in India, officials said.

Residents from 20 villages in northern India have been quarantined after coming in contact with a 70-year-old man at

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COVID-19 affecting more young people than originally thought

COVID-19 affecting more young people than originally thought

In Canada, the latest numbers on COVID-19 show that it’s hitting a demographic younger than originally anticipated.

The highest proportion of cases in Canada appear to be people ages 40-59 (37 per cent), followed by those 20-39 years of age (29 per cent) and 60-79 years of age (25 per cent). Only a small proportion of cases (four per cent) have been reported among people under the age of 19.

The numbers don’t reflect what many had expected when the pandemic was declared — that seniors would be the ones most affected.

Earl Brown, emeritus professor of virology at the University of Ottawa, says the numbers could reflect those who were active in the

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How to help the elderly and other vulnerable people during the outbreak

How to help the elderly and other vulnerable people during the outbreak

The government has said the public should now be staying at home and leaving the house only for food, medicine, to travel to work as a key worker or to exercise once a day

In addition other groups of vulnerable people – such as those with underlying health conditions and the over 70s – are also being asked to “socially distance” themselves by staying at home for 12 weeks and having minimal interaction with other people.

Although these measures may be medically necessary, charities have warned that to do so will have an impact in terms of mental health and increased loneliness – particularly for the elderly.

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Other charities that work with vulnerable groups like the homeless, have called on the prime minister to acknowledge the special needs of these groups and give additional help, resources and recourse to funds.

But are there steps that the general population

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Coyotes are roaming San Francisco's empty streets as the city's shelter-in-place order keeps people in their homes

Coyotes are roaming San Francisco’s empty streets as the city’s shelter-in-place order keeps people in their homes

A coyote walks through the sand dunes during the first round of the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am at at the Spyglass Hill Golf Course on February 11, 2010 in Pebble Beach, California.
A coyote walks through the sand dunes during the first round of the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am at at the Spyglass Hill Golf Course on February 11, 2010 in Pebble Beach, California.

Ezra Shaw/Getty

  • Coyotes are being spotted in San Francisco as the city and region hunkers down due to a shelter-in-place order to contain the coronavirus disease.

  • The animals are native to California and were once seen in the bay until hunting and poisoning nearly wiped them out.

  • The canines are taking advantage of the city’s empty, humanless streets as the number of confirmed cases in the city hit 223.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

San Francisco has all but turned into a ghost town as the city and region enters week two of a three-week shelter-in-place order to contain the coronavirus disease. 

But there have been some coyote sightings throughout the city as much of

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New antibody tests can detect whether people have had the coronavirus after they recover, but scientists still aren't sure whether people can get reinfected

New antibody tests can detect whether people have had the coronavirus after they recover, but scientists still aren’t sure whether people can get reinfected

coronavirus test
coronavirus test

Claudio Furlan/LaPresse via AP

 

There are still many unknowns about the coronavirus, but an important, lingering question is whether or not people who have recovered can get reinfected. 

“We don’t know very much,” Matt Frieman, a researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, told NPR. 

“I think there’s a very likely scenario where the virus comes through this year, and everyone gets some level of immunity to it,” he added. “And if it comes back again, we will be protected from it — either completely, or if you do get reinfected later, a year from now, then you have much less disease.”

Scientists are working to answer this question — which could play a crucial role in decisions about whether to let people who have recovered out of lockdown.

Immunity to the coronavirus 

When your body encounters the new coronavirus, it has no built-in

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