Tag: residents

India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Davidson Residents Combat Coronavirus Boredom With ‘Bear Hunt’

This article originally appeared on the Davidson Patch

DAVIDSON, NC — As the state of North Carolina prepares for a widespread “stay-at-home” order aimed at slowing the spread of the novel coronavirus COVID-19, some Davidson residents have come up with a creative activity for families.

The “stay-at-home” order announced Friday by Gov. Roy Cooper that is set to go into effect Monday at 5 p.m. The order is mandatory, and valid for 30 days through April 29, but could be revised or extended. While it’s in place, residents are directed to stay in their homes unless they need to leave for essential activities, such as for jobs, food, medicine, outdoor exercise or to help others, Cooper said.

“Looking for a fun adventure to do with the kiddos this week? How about a bear hunt in Davidson?!” the Town of Davidson said Monday in a social media post.

“Inspired by the

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Rural residents' access to hospitals is already a problem. Coronavirus could make it worse.

Rural residents’ access to hospitals is already a problem. Coronavirus could make it worse.

When Timaree Koscik’s husband, Tom, fell off the couple’s roof in Tonopah, Nevada, and shattered his heels, she knew what they had to do.

“It was just like, ‘Well, put him in the car and take him to Bishop.’ ” The closest hospital is in Bishop, California, 115 miles away. 

“You just do what you have to do,” she said.

The remoteness of Tonopah, population 2,200, now feels like a buffer against the coronavirus pandemic. It’s more than 200 miles from the flare-up of cases in Las Vegas. As of March 26, there was only one case in all of Nye County’s 18,000 square miles. 

“Honestly, I think we’re better off here in the middle of nowhere than in the cities,” Koscik said.

But she knows it’s a false sense of security. Anyone sickened by COVID-19 may be hundreds of miles from the nearest open hospital bed, ventilator or

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Preventing COVID-19 from decimating nursing home residents requires spending money and improving infection control

Preventing COVID-19 from decimating nursing home residents requires spending money and improving infection control

<span class="caption">Chuck Sedlacek, a patient at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, smiles through a window at his children. Chuck has tested positive for the coronavirus. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/chuck-sedlacek-a-patient-at-the-life-care-center-smiles-news-photo/1207624502?adppopup=true" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Getty Images / Karen Ducey">Getty Images / Karen Ducey</a></span>
Chuck Sedlacek, a patient at the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, smiles through a window at his children. Chuck has tested positive for the coronavirus. Getty Images / Karen Ducey

At least 11 people have died from COVID-19 in New Orleans nursing homes in the past week, just after the deaths at a Seattle nursing home weeks ago showed the extreme danger of the virus in nursing home settings.

Nursing homes provide care for 1.3 million Americans every day in the U.S. Under normal circumstances, these residents are more vulnerable to illness because they frequently are of advanced age and have multiple chronic conditions, such as diabetes and heart disease. COVID-19 now presents a new and dangerous threat.

Residents of the Life Care Center in Kirkland, Washington, near Seattle, were among the first in the U.S. to die from COVID-19. The frightening speed with which the virus has emerged

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Chesco Residents Are Trying To Flatten The Curve, Cell Data Shows

This article originally appeared on the Phoenixville Patch

CHESTER COUNTY, PA — As the number of new coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow, how well is Chester County doing when it comes to social distancing and doing its part to flatten the curve?

A new interactive tool developed and launched Tuesday by Unacast, a New York City and Norway-based company that analyzes “human mobility data” using information from cell phone locations, shows us exactly that.

Stay up to date on coronavirus developments, sign up for Patch news alerts.

And when it comes to social distancing, Chester County earned stellar marks in the art of staying home and therefore, ostensibly increasing the physical distance between yourself and others.

According to Unacast’s Social Distancing Scoreboard, Chester County has an overall grade of “A,” along with all of southeastern Pennsylvania. The scoreboard also says we’ve seen a roughly 55 percent

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Montco Residents Are Trying To Flatten The Curve, Cell Data Shows

This article originally appeared on the Norristown Patch

MONTGOMERY COUNTY, PA — As the number of new coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow, how well is Montgomery County doing when it comes to social distancing and doing its part to flatten the curve?

A new interactive tool developed and launched Tuesday by Unacast, a New York City and Norway-based company that analyzes “human mobility data” using information from cell phone locations, shows us exactly that.

Stay up to date on coronavirus developments, sign up for Patch news alerts.

And when it comes to social distancing, Montgomery County earned stellar marks when it comes to the art of staying home and therefore, ostensibly increasing the physical distance between yourself and others.

According to Unacast’s Social Distancing Scoreboard, Montgomery County has an overall grade of “A.” The scoreboard also says we’ve seen a roughly 55 percent decrease in distance

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

Bucks Residents Are Trying To Flatten The Curve, Cell Data Shows

This article originally appeared on the Bensalem Patch

As the number of new coronavirus cases in the United States continues to grow, how well is Bucks County doing when it comes to social distancing and doing its part to flatten the curve?

A new interactive tool developed and launched Tuesday by Unacast, a New York City and Norway-based company that analyzes human mobility data, shows us exactly that.

And when it comes to social distancing, Bucks County has earned stellar marks when it comes to staying home and increasing the physical distance between yourself and others.

According to Unacast’s Social Distancing Scoreboard, Bucks County received an overall grade of A. The scoreboard also says we’ve seen a 51 percent decrease in distance traveled by people since the coronavirus outbreak was first confirmed in the United States.

Curious how other states and counties measured up? Check out the Social Distancing Scoreboard

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This state rejected Medicaid expansion. Its uninsured residents now stare down a pandemic.

This state rejected Medicaid expansion. Its uninsured residents now stare down a pandemic.

Every six months Penny Wingard’s doctor in Charlotte, North Carolina, checks her white blood cell count even though she can’t afford the tests. After a brutal round of chemotherapy for stage 2 breast cancer in 2014 left her with chemical burns, Wingard has a compromised immune system and no health insurance.

When she lost that coverage, more medical issues followed: She had a brain aneurysm and then the chemo caused Wingard, 56, to go temporarily blind before she underwent cornea surgery. Her medical debt through all this has ballooned to more than $25,000 — an amount she has no hope of ever paying off as a part-time Lyft driver.

Penelope Wingard
Penelope Wingard

“You didn’t ask for any of this, and you didn’t ask to get sick,” Wingard said, as her voice broke and she began to cry. “You know, it’s not something that you went out there and said, ‘Oh, OK,’

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India faces spike in coronavirus cases, says study, in test for health system

First 2 Collingswood Residents Test Positive For Coronavirus

This article originally appeared on the Collingswood Patch

COLLINGSWOOD, NJ — Two Collingswood residents have tested positive for new coronavirus, officials announced on Tuesday.

Two women from Collingswood, one in her 50s and another in her 20s, were among the 18 new cases reported in Camden County. Trace investigations are underway in all the new cases, officials said.

There are now 59 total cases of new coronavirus that have been reported in Camden County, including one fatality. Read more here: Camden County’s First Coronavirus Death Reported

New Jersey Coronavirus Updates: Don’t miss local and statewide announcements about novel coronavirus precautions. Sign up for Patch alerts and daily newsletters.

“Today, we saw another 43 percent increase in cases in the county, which says two things to me: first, that testing is more widespread in the county and second, that we need to continue to isolate and aggressively socially distance to break

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Miami Beach and coastal cities, by order or plea, tell residents to stay home

Miami Beach and coastal cities, by order or plea, tell residents to stay home

Absent guidance from Gov. Ron DeSantis, multiple local governments in Miami-Dade on Monday ordered their residents to stay home as much as possible, allowing them only to leave their houses to exercise, get food and medicine, go to work if they have essential jobs and do other activities deemed necessary.

Following a conference call Monday with other cities and municipalities along the county’s east coast, Miami Beach became the first city in the county to enact a stay-at-home order. As many as nine other municipalities in North Dade are expected to enact similar orders.

“By us banding together and passing something like this, it may lead the way, may spark something,” said J.C. Jimenez, the town manager for Bay Harbor Islands.

The Beach’s new rules, which City Manager Jimmy Morales signed Monday afternoon to take effect Tuesday, were modeled after a “Safer at Home” order enacted in the city of

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Some of Mexico's wealthiest residents went to Colorado to ski. They brought home coronavirus

Some of Mexico’s wealthiest residents went to Colorado to ski. They brought home coronavirus

A skier makes tracks down a run near the Blue Sky Basin Overlook at the Vail Resort. <span class="copyright">(Chris Dillmann / Vail Daily)</span>
A skier makes tracks down a run near the Blue Sky Basin Overlook at the Vail Resort. (Chris Dillmann / Vail Daily)

Each winter, some of Mexico’s wealthiest residents flock to the snowy slopes of Colorado to ski, shop and socialize.

This year, at least 14 — and probably many more — came home infected with the coronavirus.

In a country that has not yet been hard hit by the pandemic, the travelers have become a focal point of efforts to prevent the virus from spreading widely.

Several of Mexico’s most prominent business leaders — including a banking executive, the chairman of Mexico’s stock exchange and the chief executive of the company that makes Jose Cuervo tequila — tested positive for the virus after traveling to Vail, a ski resort west of Denver.

Skiers prepare for their day at the base of Vail in the Mountain Plaza area. Resorts in Colorado are now closed due to the coronavirus. <span class="copyright">(Andy Cross / Denver Post)</span>
Skiers prepare for their day at the base of Vail in the Mountain Plaza area. Resorts in
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