Tag: study

Coronavirus Damages Placenta in Pregnant Women, According to a New Study

Coronavirus Damages Placenta in Pregnant Women, According to a New Study

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For people of reproductive age right now, one of the consistent questions about the novel coronavirus and the illnesses it can cause (like COVID-19) is what does it mean for pregnant people and those trying to conceive? As new information develops every day, researchers are beginning to get a better picture of the different ways the virus affects different bodies. And, according to a recent study published in American Journal of Clinical Pathologyresearchers at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine have found evidence of the virus “inducing some injury in the placenta” of pregnant people.

“There is an emerging consensus that there are problems with coagulation and blood vessel injury in COVID-19 patients,” senior author Dr. Jeffrey Goldstein, assistant professor of pathology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a Northwestern Medicine pathologist, said. “Our finding support that there might

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NIH to study how COVID-19 pandemic may have affected pregnancy outcomes in U.S.

May 19 (Reuters) – The National Institutes of Health (NIH) said on Tuesday it will study whether changes to the healthcare delivery system implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic have led to more pregnancy-related complications in the United States.

The study https://bit.ly/2LH0qtt will also assess the risk of pregnant COVID-19 patients transmitting the virus to their fetus, and monitor the newborns until they are discharged from the hospital.

Researchers from the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network, a group of 12 U.S. clinical centers, plan to look at medical records of 21,000 women to understand the effects of COVID-19 during and after pregnancy.

They will also monitor more than 1,500 pregnant COVID-19 patients for six weeks after childbirth.

A separate study in the UK earlier this month by Oxford University and Britain’s Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists suggested mothers-to-be are at no greater risk of severe COVID-19 than the wider population.

However,

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NIH to study how COVID-19 pandemic may have affected pregnancy outcomes in U.S

(Reuters) – The National Institutes of Health (NIH) said on Tuesday it will study whether changes to the healthcare delivery system implemented during the COVID-19 pandemic have led to more pregnancy-related complications in the United States.

The study https://bit.ly/2LH0qtt will also assess the risk of pregnant COVID-19 patients transmitting the virus to their fetus, and monitor the newborns until they are discharged from the hospital.

Researchers from the Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units Network, a group of 12 U.S. clinical centers, plan to look at medical records of 21,000 women to understand the effects of COVID-19 during and after pregnancy.

They will also monitor more than 1,500 pregnant COVID-19 patients for six weeks after childbirth.

A separate study in the UK earlier this month by Oxford University and Britain’s Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists suggested mothers-to-be are at no greater risk of severe COVID-19 than the wider population.

However, most expectant

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This study will ruin online workouts for you

This study will ruin online workouts for you

Just a few short months ago coming up with a new excuse to skip the gym was a vital part of millions of peoples’ weekly routines. Oh, how the tables have turned. Predictably, now that gyms all over the country have been closed due to COVID-19, everyone is missing their local fitness center with a burning passion.

Consequently, pretty much everyone has had to do what they can fitness-wise at home. For those among us lucky enough to live in houses complete with stocked home gyms, the transition hasn’t been too bad. But, city dwellers residing in cramped apartments with zero equipment have had a much tougher time meeting their exercise needs. 

So, millions of people have placed their collective fitness faith in online workout guides, videos, and advice articles. While such resources are certainly better than nothing, a new study finds that the vast majority of these guides largely

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Drug combination

UW Medicine ramps up study of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin for COVID-19 treatment

One of the treatments that’s been talked up by President Donald Trump for COVID-19 — a combination of the antimalarial drug hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin, an antibiotic — is the subject of a nationwide study with UW Medicine playing a role.

The Phase 2b clinical trial, sponsored by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease at the National Institutes of Health, will involve 2,000 outpatients who have tested positive for COVID-19 and are in the early stages of treatment.

“We know from a number of different other kinds of infections that if antiviral treatment is going to be effective, it tends to be most effective if it’s given very early on,” Ann Collier, a professor at the University of Washington’s School of Medicine, said in a video about the study.

The two drugs have been the subject of other studies — including a complementary 630-patient trial in which UW Medicine

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Oxford coronavirus vaccine found protective in small monkey study

By Julie Steenhuysen

(Reuters) – A closely watched coronavirus vaccine being developed by scientists at Oxford University appears protective in a small study of six monkeys, promising findings that led to the start of human trials late last month, U.S. and British researchers reported on Thursday.

The preliminary findings, which have not undergone rigorous review by other scientists, appeared on the preprint server bioRxiv on Thursday.

British drugmaker AstraZeneca last month announced it had teamed up with researchers at the Oxford Vaccine Group and the Jenner Institute, which are developing the vaccine.

According to the report, some of the monkeys given a single shot of the vaccine developed antibodies against the virus within 14 days, and all developed protective antibodies within 28 days, before being exposed to high doses of the virus.

After exposure, the vaccine appeared to prevent damage to the lungs and kept the virus from making copies

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Cats can transmit COVID-19 to other cats says new study, but not to humans

Cats can transmit COVID-19 to other cats says new study, but not to humans

According to a new study published on Wednesday, cats can become infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and may be able to pass the virus to other cats but not to humans.

Carried out by researchers at the University of Tokyo, the National Center for Global Health and Medicine and the National Institute of Infectious Diseases in Japan along with the University of Wisconsin in the USA, the new study looked at three cats in a lab setting who were given SARS-CoV-2. The next day, a cat without SARS-CoV-2 was introduced to each of the cats to see if the virus would be transmitted between them by direct contact.

After taking swabs from all six cats the researchers found that within two days one of the previously uninfected cats was shedding the virus. Within six days, all of the cats were shedding virus, and continued to do so

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Kids’ hospital visits for mental health have surged during past decade, study finds

Kids’ hospital visits for mental health have surged during past decade, study finds

Data show that children have been seeking treatment for mental health disorders in hospital emergency departments at an alarming rate, with hospitalizations for suicidal thoughts and attempts more than doubling over a decade, according to a newly published study.

And experts worry that the coronavirus pandemic will only add to existing stressors like bullying and social media pressures that could have lasting impacts into adulthood.

The study was conducted by the Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, and published Monday in the Journal Pediatrics.

“We would like children to go to their primary care provider or a psychiatrist, but [emergency departments] are the safety net for children with mental health disorders, and we need to be able to take care of them,” Dr. Rachel Stanley, study senior author and division chief of emergency medicine at Nationwide Children’s, said in a press release.

“Children don’t wear their mental health on their

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Genfit Plunges After Liver Medicine Falls Short in Study

(Bloomberg) — French biotech Genfit plunged after falling short in the race to develop a drug for a disease lurking undetected in tens of millions of people struggling with obesity and diabetes.

Preliminary data reported on Monday pointed to a failure of Genfit’s elafibranor drug in a crucial late-stage trial. The stock fell as much as 75% in Paris trading, reaching its lowest level in almost seven years and giving the company a market value of 246 million euros ($266 million).

For years, Genfit was seen as a top contender to find a treatment for a fatty liver disease known as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, or NASH, which has no existing cure on the market.

“This leaves a big question mark for us and for the entire field,” said Chief Executive Officer Pascal Prigent in an interview. “The odds are not great for us,” he said, “but we still see this space

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New study finds heavy drinking could increase risk of stroke and other heart diseases

New study finds heavy drinking could increase risk of stroke and other heart diseases

New European research has found that a higher alcohol is linked to an increased risk of stroke and peripheral artery disease (PAD), which is when the arteries narrow, reducing blood flow to certain parts of the body.

Carried out by researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, the new study used data gathered from the UK Biobank study, a large-scale research project which includes genomic information on more than half a million UK residents.

The researchers used this genetic data to investigate the link between alcohol consumption and the risk of certain cardiovascular diseases using a method called Mendelian randomization, which involves studying genetic variants to see whether certain factors are associated with a higher or lower risk of disease. As it gives more reliable results than using self-reported data, which can be prone to errors, any associations found are more likely to suggest a direct causal relationship.

The findings,

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