Tag: surfaces

The CDC says coronavirus 'does not spread easily' on surfaces or objects. Here's what we know.

The CDC says coronavirus ‘does not spread easily’ on surfaces or objects. Here’s what we know.

Update: The CDC has since clarified guidelines on coronavirus and its spread on surfaces.

Recent guidance issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sheds  new light on how coronavirus spreads through surfaces.

Though there is the possibility that coronavirus could be transmitted by touching a surface — and then your nose, mouth or eyes — the likelihood of that is lower than person-to-person contact, which is believed to be the primary way coronavirus is transmitted. 

“COVID-19 is a new disease and we are still learning about how it spreads,” says the CDC’s recently updated guidelines. 

Dr. Manisha Juthani, an infectious disease doctor and associate professor of medicine at Yale University, told USA TODAY that plenty of concern has been focused on packages and groceries during the coronavirus pandemic.

“The CDC guidelines I believe are trying to reduce fear and paranoia about methods of transmission,” she said.

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Coronavirus mainly spreads through person-to-person contact and 'does not spread easily' on contaminated surfaces

Coronavirus mainly spreads through person-to-person contact and ‘does not spread easily’ on contaminated surfaces

The CDC has updated guidelines on coronavirus' spread, saying that it's "not likely" to spread through surfaces.
The CDC has updated guidelines on coronavirus’ spread, saying that it’s “not likely” to spread through surfaces.

Even before COVID-19 officially had a name, public health officials said the virus could be transmitted through infected respiratory droplets and by touching infected surfaces and then touching your nose, mouth, and possibly your eyes. So, people began snatching up face masks, wearing gloves, and ramping up hand hygiene to try to protect themselves.

While touching infected surfaces has always been part of the messaging on how the virus spreads, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently shifted its stance online. The CDC now says that COVID-19 spreads from person to person contact, and then lists touching infected surfaces under a section titled, “The virus does not spread easily in other ways.” The CDC adds: “This is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads, but we are still

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How long does coronavirus live on different surfaces?

How long does coronavirus live on different surfaces?

<span>Photograph: John Minchillo/AP</span>
Photograph: John Minchillo/AP

More people are staying indoors to avoid contact with people potentially infected by Covid-19. But in light of a recent report from the US’s Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that said RNA from the virus that causes Covid-19 was found in the Diamond Princess ship 17 days after its passengers had left, what are the risks of handling packages, groceries and what scientists call “high-touch” surfaces?

Does the cruise ship report imply that viruses survive up to 17 days on surfaces?

Dr Julia Marcus: A CDC investigation of the cruise ship found evidence of viral RNA in cabins that hadn’t yet been cleaned. But to be clear, that just means the virus was detectable – not that it was viable or that contact with those services would have been able to infect someone. (Editor’s note: RNA, or ribonucleic acid, carries the virus’s genetic information.)

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Coronavirus can live on surfaces for days. But it can't travel through the mail, experts say

Coronavirus can live on surfaces for days. But it can’t travel through the mail, experts say

With stores stripped bare of household essentials, retailers cutting back hours and experts calling for social distancing amid the spread of coronavirus, many people may rely on delivery services to get what they need.

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine on Tuesday found that coronavirus could be detected up to three hours after aerosolization in the air, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel.

This had led some to wonder whether those packages on their front porch could spread coronavirus. The answer seems to be no. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that the virus is spread through respiratory droplets and there is currently no evidence to support the transmission of COVID-19 with imported goods.

“In general, because of poor survivability of these coronaviruses on surfaces, there

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