Tag: test

From Texas to New York, vastly different COVID test rates

From Texas to New York, vastly different COVID test rates

Over the entire month of March, while testing at among the lowest rates in the country, Oklahoma officials identified 565 cases of coronavirus. 

On April 1, following the arrival of enough chemicals to process 10,000 tests, the state changed its approach dramatically. The state went from six test sites to 14. It dropped the requirement that patients be of a “vulnerable population.” No longer did it take a doctor’s permission to get tested. Any adult with symptoms would qualify. 

Oklahoma’s total shot to 988 in just three days. And still the state’s testing rate remained stubbornly low compared to some parts of the country.

Just how low was unclear Monday as officials announced that estimates of testing levels as of last week were massively undercounted.

Oklahoma’s experience highlights some fundamental facts to emerge from last week’s surge in coronavirus testing nationally: more testing makes a huge difference; the advent of

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These anxious Californians took a COVID-19 test. Then they waited for results ... and waited

These anxious Californians took a COVID-19 test. Then they waited for results … and waited

On Sunday, Berenice Dominguez’s sore throat and cough took a dramatic turn for the worst. Her fever spiked.

Because she showed some of the symptoms of COVID-19 and had developed pneumonia, doctors at a local walk-in clinic sent Dominguez, 28, to the emergency room in Colusa, her hometown.

With her test results pending, she would lie in a bed inside the small Colusa Medical Center until Friday. Her husband, Vidal, and 4-year-old daughter, Emma, were at home, under self-quarantine, unable to visit her and not knowing if they, too, had been exposed.

“It’s the most frustrating part of this, honestly,” Dominguez said over the phone between coughing fits from her hospital bed. “It’s the not knowing.”

Dominguez’s story of waiting days for test results is one of the frustrating realities of the COVID-19 pandemic as government and private labs across the globe strain to test hundreds of thousands of samples

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Coronavirus: G7 leaders haven't found a working COVID-19 antibody test

Coronavirus: G7 leaders haven’t found a working COVID-19 antibody test

  • G7 leaders on Friday discussed the search for a home coronavirus antibody test that could allow an early exit from the international COVID-19 lockdown.
  • The tests are designed to detect whether somebody has ever contracted the coronavirus.
  • If successful, such tests could allow the roll-out of so-called “immunity passports” allowing people to leave the coronavirus lockdown early.
  • However, the UK’s Health Secretary Matt Hancock revealed that no leading industrial nation has yet identified a test which is accurate enough for use.
  • “On the G7 call earlier it was clear that no G7 country has found a home antibody test that works,” Hancock said.
  • Spain was recently forced to return thousands of testing kits after they were found to have a 30% detection rate.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The world’s leading industrial nations have so far failed to identify any coronavirus antibody tests that will be accurate enough

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Experts warn as many as 1 in 3 coronavirus test results may be incorrectly negative

Experts warn as many as 1 in 3 coronavirus test results may be incorrectly negative

An alarming new report by The Wall Street Journal suggests that nearly one in three patients who are infected with COVID-19 receive incorrectly negative test results. “A false negative is problematic because it tells the patient they don’t have the virus,” Dr. Craig Deligdish explained to the paper.

The estimate about the incorrect results is based on limited data, but the implication that tests may be far from accurate is worrisome. As Deligdish observed, it means that people who’ve been reassured they are not contagious are likely going forth and spreading the disease to others.

Health care experts additionally told The Wall Street Journal that part of the problem with the tests is how fast they’ve been approved. “The thing that is different this time is most of these tests are going through a really rapid validation process,” said Ohio State University epidemiologist Bill Miller. “As a result, we can’t

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Cheap antibody test sent for validation in coronavirus fight

Cheap antibody test sent for validation in coronavirus fight

By Alistair Smout and Andrew MacAskill

LONDON (Reuters) – A British company behind a 10-minute coronavirus antibody test, which will cost about a $1, has begun sending prototypes to laboratories for validation, which could be a game-changer in the fight against the pandemic.

Health technology firm Mologic, which created one of the first at-home pregnancy tests, is aiming for the test to be rolled out by as early as June if the trials are successful.

Antibody tests are designed to establish whether people have previously been infected, as opposed to antigen tests which show if someone actually has the COVID-19 disease caused by the virus.

Mologic said assessment and validation of its COVID-19 diagnostic test had begun this week at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and St Georges hospital, and that global partners would also examine the prototypes.

Joe Fitchett, Mologic medical director, said that while many companies were

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British firm says antibody test is being validated

British firm says antibody test is being validated

LONDON (Reuters) – Prototypes of a coronavirus antibody test which could be a game-changer in the fight against the pandemic are being assessed and are ready to be optimised, the developer of the technology said on Thursday.

Antibody tests are designed to establish whether people have previously been infected, as opposed to antigen tests which show if someone actually has the COVID-19 disease caused by the virus.

Health technology firm Mologic said assessment and validation of its COVID-19 diagnostic test had begun this week at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine and St Georges hospital, and that global partners would also examine the prototypes.

“Completion of the first prototypes is a significant step in Mologic’s development of a rapid diagnostic test for COVID-19 and we are proud of our team’s achievement in reaching this point so quickly, while maintaining the most rigorous standards,” said Paul Davis, Co-Founder and Chief Scientific

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Why NC officials say ‘stay home,’ you don’t need a test for mild symptoms of COVID-19

Why NC officials say ‘stay home,’ you don’t need a test for mild symptoms of COVID-19

State officials want people with mild symptoms of COVID-19 to stay home and possibly skip being tested as health care workers’ supplies shrink and wait times for test results grow.

Some communities in North Carolina are already under “stay at home” or “shelter in place” orders, including Mecklenburg County, the state’s most-populous county. Restrictions to force more people to work from home and avoid non-essential errands and travel go into effect Thursday night in Durham and Friday night in Orange County. Those orders permit people to leave their homes to seek medical treatment, as well as for some other needs.

But now N.C. health officials say that because health care workers are strained and testing is limited, more people — specifically those with mild symptoms — should stay home.

“Testing is most important for people who are seriously ill, in the hospital, people in high-risk settings like nursing homes or

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Prince Charles did not jump the queue for a coronavirus test, UK says

Prince Charles did not jump the queue for a coronavirus test, UK says

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain on Thursday said heir-to-the-throne Prince Charles, who has coronavirus, did not jump the queue for a test because his symptoms and condition met the criteria.

Charles, 71, tested positive for coronavirus earlier this week but is in good health and is now self-isolating at his residence in Scotland with mild symptoms along with his wife Camilla, who tested negative, his office said.

The prince, who is in good spirits, was working at his desk as usual on Thursday, a royal source said. He has received hundreds of get well messages, the source added.

When asked why the heir had had a test while millions of frontline health workers have not, Britain’s junior health minister, Edward Argar, said: “My understanding is that his symptoms, his condition, met that criteria.”

“The Prince of Wales didn’t jump the queue,” Argar told Sky news.

According to advice on the Scotland’s

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The FBI Physical Fitness Test App

I Took the FBI Fitness Test, And I Failed

At-home fitness is, unfortunately, having a moment. Everyone has vowed to become super hot and super fit during this period of social distancing, right? So, for some reason, the Federal Bureau of Investigation decided they had to get a piece of the current workout madness: Whatever junior-level paper pusher that runs the FBI’s Twitter account tweeted out a link to the Bureau’s physical fitness test app on Monday. My first thought was that this represented the moment that socially distanced fitness jumped the shark. My second though was to see if I had what it takes to be an agent.

It’s worth mentioning here that the app asks for some wildly invasive access to your phone—ostensibly to time your runs via GPS. Right. Luckily, this handy Special Agent Selection Process brochure has all of the same Physical Fitness Test (PFT) protocols in it, if you want to keep your options

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U.S. companies, labs rush to produce blood test for coronavirus immunity

U.S. companies, labs rush to produce blood test for coronavirus immunity

By Chad Terhune, Allison Martell and Julie Steenhuysen

(Reuters) – As the United States works overtime to screen thousands for the novel coronavirus, a new blood test offers the chance to find out who may have immunity – a potential game changer in the battle to contain infections and get the economy back on track.

Several academic laboratories and medical companies are rushing to produce these blood tests, which can quickly identify disease-fighting antibodies in people who already have been infected but may have had mild symptoms or none at all. This is different from the current, sometimes hard-to-come-by diagnostic tests that draw on a nasal swab to confirm active infection.

“Ultimately, this (antibody test) might help us figure out who can get the country back to normal,” Florian Krammer, a professor in vaccinology at Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine, told Reuters. “People who are immune could be the

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