Tag: Treat

Should you take paracetamol rather than ibuprofen to treat symptoms?

Should you take paracetamol rather than ibuprofen to treat symptoms?

While there have been calls for coronavirus tests to be made available to NHS staff and the wider public, currently individuals are only tested if they are being treated in hospital.

For the rest of the public, the UK government says if you show symptoms for the virus — the two main symptoms being a high temperature and a new, continuous cough — you should stay at home for seven days and not call 111 or attend a GP or hospital.

If you do not get better on your own within a week, or your symptoms get worse, then you can seek medical help, says the most recent NHS advice.

Currently there is no specific treatment for coronavirus and any potential treatment, in hospital or elsewhere, simply aims to relieve symptoms rather than cure them.

So what should you do if you’re at home with symptoms and waiting for them

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China promotes bile from caged bears to treat pandemic ‘caused by exploiting wildlife’

China promotes bile from caged bears to treat pandemic ‘caused by exploiting wildlife’

The Chinese government is touting bile extracted from caged bears as a treatment for coronavirus, which experts have branded “hugely irresponsible”.

Scientists agree that China’s wildlife trade – notably markets where species are crammed closely together – was the most likely source of the coronavirus pandemic.

But in a list of recommended treatments for Covid-19, the country’s National Health Commission promotes injections of a “traditional medicine” treatment containing bear bile.

An estimated 12,000 bears are held in captivity on farms and “milked” regularly for their bile in China and Vietnam.

According to charity Animals Asia, the cages in China are sometimes so small that the bears are unable to turn around or stand on all fours. Some are put into cages as cubs and never leave them. They may grow too large to fit through the cage door or remain stunted.

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“Bears may be kept caged like this

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Scientists chase two fronts in how to treat coronavirus, but 'there's no magic drug right now'

Scientists chase two fronts in how to treat coronavirus, but ‘there’s no magic drug right now’

SAN FRANCISCO – Doctors and scientists are working furiously to find effective treatments for the illness caused by the new coronavirus but are cautioning the public not to self-medicate or hoard mentioned drugs not yet proven to work.

Despite widespread rumors, social media reports and President Donald Trump’s own optimism surrounding the effectiveness of several existing drugs, so far there are no proven treatments for COVID-19, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“There’s no magic drug out there right now,” Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said at a news conference Thursday. 

When COVID-19 treatments do arrive, they will likely fall into two categories, experts say. The first will be aimed at slowing down replication of the virus in patients early in the disease. The second will help stop the deadly autoinflammatory response in the lungs in its critical stage.

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Could chloroquine treat coronavirus? 5 questions answered about a promising, problematic and unproven use for an antimalarial drug

Could chloroquine treat coronavirus? 5 questions answered about a promising, problematic and unproven use for an antimalarial drug

<span class="caption">An employee in Nantong, China, checks the production of chloroquine phosphate, an old drug for the treatment of malaria. </span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images</span></span>
An employee in Nantong, China, checks the production of chloroquine phosphate, an old drug for the treatment of malaria. Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

An Arizona man died, and his wife was hospitalized, after taking a form of chloroquine, which President Trump has touted as an effective treatment for COVID-19. The couple decided to self-medicate with chloroquine phosphate, which they had on hand to kill parasites in their fish, after hearing the president describe the drug as a “game changer.”

Dr. Anthony Fauci, head of NIH’s National Institute for Allergies and Infectious Diseases, quickly corrected the statement, explaining that Trump’s comments were based on anecdotes and not a controlled clinical trial.

I am a medicinal chemist who specializes in discovery and development of antiviral drugs, and I have been actively working on coronaviruses for seven years.

However, because I am a scientist and I deal in facts and evidence-based

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Inhalers used to treat coronavirus causing shortage for asthma sufferers, experts say

Inhalers used to treat coronavirus causing shortage for asthma sufferers, experts say

The American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology is warning asthma sufferers that the novel coronavirus is causing a shortage of albuterol inhalers.

Albuterol opens the air passages in the lungs and is commonly used to treat asthma as well as cough, wheezing and shortness of breath, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Now, it’s being used to treat COVID-19 and the ACAAI is telling asthma sufferers to expect shortages.

Nearly 25 million people in the United States have asthma, according to 2018 data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“The shortage is occurring because of the increased use of albuterol inhalers in hospitals for COVID-19 and suspected COVID-19 patients to help with respiratory issues,” the ACAAI said in a news release.

Only “certain parts of the country” are experiencing shortages, the college said in the March 20 release, but they’re expected to spread throughout the U.S.

Typically, hospital

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As COVID-19 cases rise, UNC Health system needs help to treat patients and health care workers

As COVID-19 cases rise, UNC Health system needs help to treat patients and health care workers

As the leader of UNC Health, a system of 11 hospitals across North Carolina and the dean of the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, to say the last several weeks have been stressful would be a vast understatement. Our collective mission is to promote the health and well-being of the people of North Carolina. In this COVID-19 pandemic our two priorities are the appropriate diagnosis and care of our patients and the safety of our co-workers. Individuals across our state are stepping up to help in this crisis. In our system, we have created a leadership team to oversee vast preparation and operational strategies. The level of coordination from our senior executive team, our affiliate leaders and every clinical and operational aspect of our system has proven truly remarkable. The collaboration with other health systems in our state and the leadership of the Governor and legislative leaders has

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Engineers develop robots to treat and test Covid-19 patients in a bid to protect health workers

Engineers develop robots to treat and test Covid-19 patients in a bid to protect health workers

Coronavirus Article Bar with counter ..

Engineers in China have developed a robot to treat and test Covid-19 patients while allowing healthcare workers to remain at a safe distance from the highly infectious virus.

The remote-controlled, wheeled machine can take mouth swabs, perform ultrasound scans and listen to organs with a robot stethoscope.

Medical staff can operate the robots from a safe distance using onboard cameras to monitor the patient.

High infection rates among health care workers have hampered efforts to tackle the outbreak, prompting the designers to see if a robot could provide protection.

Robot engineers have long promised their machines will eventually save human workers from dull, dangerous or dirty work. The coronavirus epidemic presents and opportunity to tests what robots may be able to do, some scientists believe.

“Doctors are all very brave,” the robot’s chief designer, Tsinghua University Professor Zheng Gangtie told Reuters. “But this

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Trump's Embrace of Unproven Drugs to Treat Coronavirus Defies Science

Trump’s Embrace of Unproven Drugs to Treat Coronavirus Defies Science

President Donald Trump during a news conference at the White House about the federal response to the coronavirus outbreak, Washington, March 20, 2020. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times)
President Donald Trump during a news conference at the White House about the federal response to the coronavirus outbreak, Washington, March 20, 2020. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times)

At a long-winded White House briefing Friday, President Donald Trump enthusiastically and repeatedly promoted the promise of two long-used malaria drugs that are still unproven against the coronavirus but are being tested in clinical trials.

“I’m a smart guy,” he said, while acknowledging he couldn’t predict the drugs would work. “I feel good about it. And we’re going to see. You’re going to see soon enough.”

But the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, delicately — yet forcefully — pushed back from the same stage, explaining that there was only anecdotal evidence that the drugs, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, may be effective.

“The president feels optimistic about something, has feelings about it,” said Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy

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