Tag: Treating

France banned the use of hydroxychloroquine for treating the coronavirus a week after Trump said he was taking the drug

France banned the use of hydroxychloroquine for treating the coronavirus a week after Trump said he was taking the drug

The French government on Wednesday banned the use of Hydroxychloroquine for treating COVID-19.
The French government on Wednesday banned the use of Hydroxychloroquine for treating COVID-19.

GEORGE FREY/AFP via Getty Images

  • France has banned the use of hydroxychloroquine for treating the coronavirus, reversing a March order that allowed the drug — typically used to treat malaria and lupus — to be used to treat COVID-19.

  • The World Health Organization on Monday announced it was temporarily suspending the use of the drug in an ongoing trial.

  • There is no clinical evidence that the drug is successful in preventing or treating the novel coronavirus.

  • US President Donald Trump, who has championed the drug, said last week he was taking the drug as a preventative measure.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The French government on Wednesday banned the use of hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of COVID-19, reversing a previous order from March that allowed the anti-malarial drug to be used as an experimental treatment

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Trump says he has started taking hydroxychloroquine. Last month the FDA said the drug has 'not been shown to be safe and effective for treating or preventing COVID-19.'

Trump says he has started taking hydroxychloroquine. Last month the FDA said the drug has ‘not been shown to be safe and effective for treating or preventing COVID-19.’

President Donald Trump speaks after exiting Air Force One at Lehigh Valley International Airport in Allentown, Pa., Thursday, May 14, 2020. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
President Donald Trump speaks after exiting Air Force One at Lehigh Valley International Airport in Allentown, Pa., Thursday, May 14, 2020. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Associated Press

  • President Donald Trump Monday said on Monday that he has been taking the experimental drug hydroxychloroquine “every day” for a week and a half.

  • However, there is no clinical evidence so far that proves the drug is effective against COVID-19, and there are not yet any approved treatments or vaccines for the disease.

  • In April, the US Food and Drug Administration issued a clear-cut warning against the use of chloroquine or the derivative drug hydroxychloroquine to treat COVID-19, stating it posed a risk of heart rhythm problems. 

  • In its guidance, the FDA said that hydroxychloroquine has “not been shown to be safe and effective for treating or preventing COVID-19.”

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump Monday said on Monday that

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Meet the Doctors and Nurses Treating Coronavirus Patients in NYC

Meet the Doctors and Nurses Treating Coronavirus Patients in NYC

WHEN’S THE LAST time you were in a hospital? As the patient.

Maybe it’s been a while. Here’s how it goes, usually: You’re in the bed. Seven a.m. is shift change. The night nurse comes in—she’s going home, so she makes sure everything is all set for the day nurse. (You think you know what nurses do, but until you spend some time in a hospital, you have no idea. Nurses run health care.)

Guy shuffles in to take the trash. He whips the new bag in the air, and the noise is like a firecracker.

Does he not know I’m sleeping?

You didn’t sleep much, what with the beeping machines, the whirring of the IV, the glow of the monitor logging your pulse, blood-oxygen level, everything.

morgan stanley adult emergency department

BENEDICT EVANS

A woman comes in to wipe everything down. The bracing smell of the disinfectant cools your nostrils. There’s something comforting about

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Trump, Fauci tout 'good news' from remdesivir drug trial in treating COVID-19

Trump, Fauci tout ‘good news’ from remdesivir drug trial in treating COVID-19

Infectious disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci on Wednesday touted the results of trial examining an experimental drug treatment for the novel coronavirus, calling it “good news” as he spoke in the Oval Office alongside President Donald Trump.

A randomized, international trial of the drug remdesivir had resulted in “quite good news,” shortening the period patients experienced symptoms and potentially slightly reducing the mortality rate, according to Fauci, a member of the White House’s coronavirus task force and the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which sponsored the trial.

“What it has proven is that a drug can block this virus,” Fauci said, calling the development “very optimistic.”

Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

The trial

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At NYC hospital treating coronavirus, doctors 'use their MD license like they haven't had to before'

At NYC hospital treating coronavirus, doctors ‘use their MD license like they haven’t had to before’

The head of urology is working nights in the emergency room.

The chairman of orthopedics is picking up shifts in the intensive care unit.

For some, it’s the type of work in a hospital that they haven’t done in decades. And it’s necessary, said Dr. Steven Corwin, as the new coronavirus devastates communities and stretches hospitals and staffs to their limits in New York.

“This has fundamentally altered the way we care for patients in the hospital,” Corwin, the president and CEO of NewYork-Presbyterian, told USA TODAY.

In his 40 years of medicine, Corwin said he’s never seen this sort of response to a disease. Not during the AIDS pandemic. Not during H1N1.

In New York, 2,373 people have died from complications due to COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Thursday. New York City alone has seen 1,562 deaths and 49,707 known cases leading

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Nurses treating coronavirus say they are reusing masks, back to work before 14-day quarantine

Nurses treating coronavirus say they are reusing masks, back to work before 14-day quarantine

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y. – New York nurses on the front line of the coronavirus outbreak are afraid their safety is being sacrificed so hospitals can stretch dwindling stockpiles of protective equipment.

Central to the fear are new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines seeking to help hospitals conserve medical masks as thousands of New Yorkers are infected with COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus.

Some nurses asserted hospital officials asked them to make a typically single-use surgical mask last a week, leaving them to store it in paper bags between shifts.

Other nurses described begging for access to higher level N95 masks and watching fellow nurses get quarantined after suspected COVID-19 exposures amid shortages.

Lori Glazer of Ossining, N.Y., rides the empty local 7:14 a.m. Metro-North train in to New York City during what would typically be morning rush hour on March 25. Glazer is a registered nurse in the Children's Hospital at New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Medical Center.
Lori Glazer of Ossining, N.Y., rides the empty local 7:14 a.m. Metro-North train in to New York City during what would typically be morning rush hour on March 25. Glazer is a registered nurse
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Duke says it has found a way to safely reuse masks worn when treating COVID-19 patients

Duke says it has found a way to safely reuse masks worn when treating COVID-19 patients

Duke Health says it will stretch its supply of specialized masks used by health care workers treating coronavirus patients by decontaminating and reusing them.

Duke will use aerosolized hydrogen peroxide to treat N95 masks at its three hospitals in Durham and Raleigh. The gas permeates the masks to kill germs, including viruses, without harming the material, Duke says.

Duke routinely uses hydrogen peroxide gas to sterilize equipment and even entire rooms. The technique for decontaminating masks this way was developed elsewhere a few years ago but wasn’t thought necessary, said Matthew Stiegel, director of Duke’s Occupational and Environmental Safety Office.

“We had never considered needing it for something like face masks,” Stiegel said in a written statement. “But we’ve now proven that it works and will begin using the technology immediately in all three Duke Health hospitals.”

N95 masks are one type of personal protective equipment that hospitals are trying

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COVID-19 lung patterns show few clues for treating pneumonia

COVID-19 lung patterns show few clues for treating pneumonia

Shown is a CT scan from a 65-year-old man in China with COVID-19. Pneumonia caused by the new coronavirus can show up as distinctive hazy patches on the outer edges of the lungs, indicated by arrows. <span class="copyright">(Mount Sinai Hospital via Associated Press)</span>
Shown is a CT scan from a 65-year-old man in China with COVID-19. Pneumonia caused by the new coronavirus can show up as distinctive hazy patches on the outer edges of the lungs, indicated by arrows. (Mount Sinai Hospital via Associated Press)

Scans of the lungs of the sickest COVID-19 patients show distinctive patterns of infection, but so far those clues are offering little help in predicting which patients will pull through.

For now, doctors are relying on what’s called supportive care, which is standard for treating patients with severe pneumonia.

Doctors in areas still bracing for an onslaught of sick patients are scouring medical reports and hosting webinars with Chinese doctors to get the best advice on what has and hasn’t worked.

One thing that’s clear around the globe: Age makes a huge difference in survival. And one reason is that seniors’ lungs don’t have as much of what

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"It's Like Treating the Flu, Until It's Not"

“It’s Like Treating the Flu, Until It’s Not”

What do we know about COVID-19? That it spreads easily and from people without symptoms. That it can survive for hours or days on metal or plastic. That it is particularly dangerous for those over 60, due to comorbidities and weakened immune systems. That most people don’t have life-threatening symptoms, and a lot of us — estimates of some 20 to 60 percent of the population — are going to get it. What don’t we know? A whole lot more than we do, including what it’s like to get it for most people and how best to treat it when you do. 

RELATED: Doctors Answer Parent’s Coronavirus FAQs

This gap in knowledge has caused a lot of misinformation and fighting about which drugs are safe to treat COVID-19. The French health minister led the way with bold, brazen (and mostly unsubstantiated) claims that ibuprofen and its family of pain-relievers, known

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