Tag: Trumps

Trump’s Critics Attack His Optimistic Case for Hydroxychloroquine

Trump’s Critics Attack His Optimistic Case for Hydroxychloroquine

President Donald Trump’s foes are foaming at the mouth again. Since late March, the president has dreamed that hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), perhaps coupled with Zithromax (azithromycin), might defeat COVID-19, for which there is no cure or vaccine. Trump discussed this 65-year-old anti-malaria drug at a daily briefing on this pandemic. “It’s shown very, very encouraging early results” among researchers, Trump said. These two drugs “taken together, have a real chance to be one of the biggest game changers in the history of medicine,” he stated via Twitter.

“Very encouraging” and “real chance” are words of aspiration, not prescription. And Trump repeatedly has said that these drugs ultimately might fail, but nonetheless should be investigated.

“If we’re going to go into labs and test all of this for a long time, we can test it on people right now who are in serious trouble, who are dying,” Trump told journalists. “If

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Hydroxychloroquine is Trump's coronavirus wonder drug. Does it work?

Hydroxychloroquine is Trump’s coronavirus wonder drug. Does it work?

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TL;DR: President Trump keeps hyping a potential coronavirus treatment — a “cocktail” of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin. Does it work? Well, it doesn’t appear to be a miracle cure, but some early evidence suggests it might help. South Korea and China

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Trump's push for risky malaria drugs disrupts coronavirus response

Trump’s push for risky malaria drugs disrupts coronavirus response

“It’s not the right thing to do, in the middle of a pandemic, to throw the kitchen sink — even guided by Oracle — at patients,” said Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at NYU.

Scientists are trying to answer some of the gaping questions about chloroquine: The World Health Organization is launching a global trial of the drug and other potential treatments, while New York state is enrolling patients in its own study this week.

“Using untested medicines without the right evidence will raise false hope and even do more harm than good — and cause a shortage of essential medicines that are needed to treat other diseases,” said Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, director-general of the World Health Organization.

But in the U.S., where Trump has taken to touting chloroquine’s “very powerful” abilities in press conferences, the president and Vice President Mike Pence are encouraging off-label use since the medicine is

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The coronavirus pandemic has made Trump's psychiatric issues clear. We should remove him for our own safety

The coronavirus pandemic has made Trump’s psychiatric issues clear. We should remove him for our own safety

We knew this presidency would be deadly. We were not exaggerating when, three years ago, we put together the public-service book, The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 27 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President. We meant in part that the president would be dangerous to civic life, to democracy, and to the nation’s mental health — but we also meant that he would endanger lives.

Politics did not concern us. We are health professionals. Everything falls secondary to life and death, including politics.

After we got together to write the book, hundreds, and later thousands, more mental health professionals gathered from all over the country and the world with their shared concerns. Together we formed first the National Coalition, and then the World Mental Health Coalition, to organize around our goal of societal safety.

Through consultation with Congress members, letters, petitions, and education of the public, we tried

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Trump's Embrace of Unproven Drugs to Treat Coronavirus Defies Science

Trump’s Embrace of Unproven Drugs to Treat Coronavirus Defies Science

President Donald Trump during a news conference at the White House about the federal response to the coronavirus outbreak, Washington, March 20, 2020. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times)
President Donald Trump during a news conference at the White House about the federal response to the coronavirus outbreak, Washington, March 20, 2020. (Erin Schaff/The New York Times)

At a long-winded White House briefing Friday, President Donald Trump enthusiastically and repeatedly promoted the promise of two long-used malaria drugs that are still unproven against the coronavirus but are being tested in clinical trials.

“I’m a smart guy,” he said, while acknowledging he couldn’t predict the drugs would work. “I feel good about it. And we’re going to see. You’re going to see soon enough.”

But the nation’s leading infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, delicately — yet forcefully — pushed back from the same stage, explaining that there was only anecdotal evidence that the drugs, chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine, may be effective.

“The president feels optimistic about something, has feelings about it,” said Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy

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Trump's breathless takes on drugs for virus

Trump’s breathless takes on drugs for virus

WASHINGTON (AP) — “Could be a game changer.” “Very exciting.” “The way they acted with this kind of speed is an incredible thing.” “Very powerful.” “This could be a tremendous breakthrough. Tremendous breakthrough.” “We’re going to be able to make that drug available almost immediately.” “There’s tremendous promise.”

That’s President Donald Trump, inflating expectations about an end game to the coronavirus crisis with his positive spin on a disease that is spreading with no federally approved drug treatments, no preventive medicine, no cure and not enough equipment to help everyone sick from it.

Trump commanded the daily coronavirus task force briefings at the White House this past week, fashioning himself as a wartime president and making a variety of statements about the pandemic that were problematic or just wrong.

The public health officials who were with him walked back some of those statements. Most strikingly, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of

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