Tag: workers

Medical Workers Fighting COVID Say Cops Are Attacking Them

Medical Workers Fighting COVID Say Cops Are Attacking Them

Courtesy of Rayne Valentine
Courtesy of Rayne Valentine

Twenty minutes after leaving his job at a Brooklyn hospital on Saturday night, 32-year-old Rayne Valentine was lying in the fetal position on the sidewalk. 

He’d been beaten and kicked by New York police officers, his hospital ID smeared with his own blood, he told The Daily Beast.

Valentine, a Marine veteran who worked as a chef before the pandemic hit the restaurant industry, got a job in March at Kings County Hospital Center. He has spent the past several months moving medicine and patients around the facility, as well as piling hundreds of dead bodies—many of them COVID-19 victims—into refrigerated morgue trucks. 

Valentine told The Daily Beast on Tuesday that he needed a job, but, like many Americans, he also felt helpless and wanted to contribute on the front lines of the deadly pandemic. Unfortunately, his is just one of many horrifying stories of medical

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Health care workers in the acute care COVID unit at Harborview Medical Center show off their covid socks on May 7, 2020 in Seattle.

UW Medicine Furloughs 4,000 More Workers Amid Financial Losses

SEATTLE, WA — UW Medicine will temporarily furlough an additional 4,000 unionized workers on top of the 1,500 nonunion staff furloughed last week, the health care system announced Monday, saying the cuts were necessary to cover $500 million in expected losses due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Monday’s announcement followed bargaining with unions representing the workers, UW Medicine said in a statement. Affected workers, some of whom volunteered to be furloughed, will be out of work from one to eight weeks, and will keep benefits including health insurance.

The furloughs affect staff across UW Medicine, including at Harborview Medical Center, two University of Washington Medical Center campuses and UW Neighborhood Clinics. Some executives, directors and managers at UW Medicine are also participating according to the system.

The cuts are likely to affect UW Medicine workers who were among the nation’s first on the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis, which hit

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On Thursday, health care workers stood in protest outside of UW Medicine's Harborview Medical Center asking management to do more to protect staff and patients.

UW Medicine Announces Furloughs for 1,500 Workers

SEATTLE, WA — UW Medicine has announced the temporary furlough of 1,500 of their workers. The university says the move is unfortunate, but necessary to recoup part of the $500 million UW Medicine expects to lose to the coronavirus pandemic.

The affected employees will be placed on furlough from one to eight weeks. During that time, UW Medicine says employees will be able to keep all their benefits, including their health insurance.

The furloughs will affect employees from all sorts of positions, from executive directors and managers to staff at Harborview Medical Center, the University of Washington Medical Center campuses and more. Valley Medical Center has already seen a round of furloughs and staffing changes due to the pandemic.

UW says some employees have volunteered for furlough, others have been chosen by management. Organizers say furloughs are a difficult choice to make, and a last-ditch effort to keep UW Medicine

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LGBTQ health workers on the front lines as Supreme Court weighs job protections

LGBTQ health workers on the front lines as Supreme Court weighs job protections

For the past two months, physician assistant Mia McDonald and Dr. Ly Pham – one in North Carolina, the other in Louisiana – have been steady warriors in a battle with a beast that has ravaged this nation.

Their spirits have sagged with defeat, been buoyed by hope. There have been moments of calm, hours of exhaustion.

But an uneasy reality haunts these LGBTQ health care workers on the front lines in the coronavirus pandemic: They are employed in states where they could be fired for their sexual orientation and gender identity.

The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to rule soon in a trio of landmark cases that could guarantee federal protections to LGBTQ workers such as McDonald and Pham. The timing couldn’t be more urgent, advocates say. 

“Like all health care providers, LGBTQ people are standing up to personal and professional challenges in this pandemic. They are risking their

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Emergency Medical Workers Are Integral to the Fight Against Coronavirus. Just a Few Decades Ago, America's EMS System Didn't Even Exist

Emergency Medical Workers Are Integral to the Fight Against Coronavirus. Just a Few Decades Ago, America’s EMS System Didn’t Even Exist

EMS Week, which takes place in 2020 from May 17-23, is an annual time to recognize the life-saving efforts of emergency medical services personnel. While celebratory events won’t take place in person this year, EMS personnel are getting more recognition than usual: even before EMS week, virtually and during daily cheers for healthcare workers, they are widely hailed as heroes on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic.

But though sick people have always needed someone to help get them to medical attention, the modern American EMS field is only about five decades old — and can be traced to what one scholarly report called a “neglected epidemic.”

As driving, especially highway driving, became a central part of American society, so did accidental injuries and preventable deaths due to inadequate care after car accidents. Doctors were overextended and new types of medical personnel were needed to take some pre-diagnostic tasks

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Seasonal and undocumented workers in Portugal fall through safety net

Seasonal and undocumented workers in Portugal fall through safety net

By Victoria Waldersee

LISBON(Reuters) – Fatima, 57, was midway through a course for the long-term unemployed at her local job centre in Lisbon, earning about 10 euros a day selling jewellery and knick-knacks at street stalls and community centres to make ends meet.

Then the coronavirus pandemic hit.

“I’m so embarrassed to be here,” she told Reuters as she picked up her daily meal from Comunidade Vida e Paz, a community organisation delivering food to the needy every night.

“Without this pandemic I would never have considered it. But I’m not earning a cent.”

Like tens of thousands of undocumented, migrant or seasonal workers in Portugal hit hard by the outbreak, Fatima is falling through the national safety net.

They lack the contracts and payslips needed to apply for unemployment benefits, and many are turning to charities for help.

Although unemployment rose 9% in March, spending on unemployment benefits fell

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Spanish ambulance workers fear virus rebound

Spanish ambulance workers fear virus rebound

MADRID (AP) — For the first time in weeks, Dr. Mónica Rodríguez has found some respite. But even as she enjoys card games and magic tricks at her ambulance team’s base in Madrid, the emergency doctor is not letting her guard down.

Her team is only catching its breath before the next urgent call comes in, whether coronavirus-related or not.

“The virus is out there and will remain. It’s not going to disappear,” Dr. Rodríguez said during an AP photographer’s recent visit with the team.

After helping to flatten one of Europe’s sharpest contagion curves in the coronavirus pandemic, exhausted ambulance workers in Madrid fear that a resurgence in infections could mean another frantic period on the front line.

“We fear a rebound,” Dr. Rodríguez said as Spain takes its first steps to phase out a strict 7-week confinement after roughly 27,000 reported coronavirus fatalities. “Unfortunately, people are not taking

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the US health workers who died from Covid-19

the US health workers who died from Covid-19

Kaiser Health News

America’s healthcare workers are dying. In some states, medical staff account for as many as 20% of known coronavirus cases. From doctors to hospital cleaners and from nursing home aides to paramedics, those most at risk have already helped save thousands of lives.

Not all these medical professionals survive their encounters with patients. Hospitals are overwhelmed, workers lack protective equipment and some staff suffer from underlying health conditions that make them vulnerable to this pernicious virus.

Health authorities in the US have no consistent way of tallying the deaths of healthcare workers. As of 14 April, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 27 deaths among health workers – but our reporting shows that is likely a vast undercount.

Lost on the frontline is a collaboration between the Guardian and Kaiser Health News that aims to document the lives of healthcare workers in the US who

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American hospitals have lost dozens of medical workers to the coronavirus. Here are some of their stories.

American hospitals have lost dozens of medical workers to the coronavirus. Here are some of their stories.

healthcare workers who died on the frontlines 2x1
healthcare workers who died on the frontlines 2×1

Provided by the family of Thomas Pattugalan; Provided by Lakes Dunson Robertson Funeral Home; Provided by the family of Douglas Linn Hikok; Provided by Marya Sherron; Provided by Jhoanna Buendia; Provided by Debra Lyons; Samantha Lee/Business Insider

  • More than two dozen US healthcare workers on the frontlines of the pandemic have died from the coronavirus.

  • Many doctors, nurses, EMTs, and medical support staff members had been forced to reuse their personal protective equipment during their shifts, making them especially susceptible to the virus.

  • Business Insider wanted to share the stories of some of those who gave their lives in the line of duty.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

While most Americans are confined to their homes amidst state and city-wide lockdowns, healthcare workers continue to live on the frontlines of the coronavirus pandemic.

In the past two months, more than 9,000

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Thousands of healthcare workers are laid off or furloughed as coronavirus spreads

Thousands of healthcare workers are laid off or furloughed as coronavirus spreads

The Stanford Health Care system is making across-the-board cuts due to the financial squeeze from the pandemic. <span class="copyright">(Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)</span>
The Stanford Health Care system is making across-the-board cuts due to the financial squeeze from the pandemic. (Al Seib / Los Angeles Times)

Healthcare workers, championed as heroes of the COVID-19 crisis and applauded for risking their lives to protect others, have been hit especially hard by the severe economic fallout wrought by the pandemic.

In California, thousands of nurses, doctors and other medical staff have been laid off or furloughed or have taken a pay cut since mid-March. The pain has been felt broadly, from major facilities such as Stanford Health Care to tiny rural hospitals to private practitioners. Across the nation, job losses in the healthcare sector have been second only to those in the restaurant industry, according to federal labor statistics.

Hospitals and doctors’ offices lost billions in revenue when they canceled elective surgeries and non-emergent visits to prepare for a possible surge in COVID-19 patients and

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